Open ended Spanners : POLL

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Open ended Spanners : POLL

What is happening in pic ?

  • Tightening

    Votes: 6 46.2%
  • Slackening

    Votes: 1 7.7%
  • Either : doesn't matter

    Votes: 6 46.2%

  • Total voters
    13
  • Poll closed .
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We all come across this scenario:rolleyes:

Where you dont have access to a socket.. or ring spanner

So.. as in the Attatched pic

Am I trying to tighten.. slacken.. or it doesnt matter?
 

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I would say you are slackening, but I don't think it matters. I used to find the jaws would spread when I gave it the beans, but I have never broken an OE spanner apart from when bashing it with an unreasonably sized hammer. No need to worry about that these days. They either undo or not. Thank heavens for the whizzy gun.

I think the bend on the neck is to allow access when you can only get 1 or a half flat at a time. If it was an adjustable then there is a right way round.
 
Last edited:
I was always taught that (given the thread is right handed) you would be holding the spanner in this orientation to tighten if at all possible. However the offset of the jaws allows for it to be turned round to engage the nut when movement is restricted - ie you can get a half flat offset by turning the spanner over. As I have a very comprehensive choice of ring keys, sockets, ratchets etc I very rarely use an open ender these days.
 
I was always taught that (given the thread is right handed) you would be holding the spanner in this orientation to tighten if at all possible. However the offset of the jaws allows for it to be turned round to engage the nut when movement is restricted - ie you can get a half flat offset by turning the spanner over. As I have a very comprehensive choice of ring keys, sockets, ratchets etc I very rarely use an open ender these days.

Thanks Jock..
Feel free to VOTE at the top :)
 
Thanks Jock..
Feel free to VOTE at the top :)
I'm using phone app , how do I vote for the multiple choice answer c?

Though now I'm not so sure because if loosening in picture and spanner slips then you smash your knuckles on the back part of the machine bed.
Open ended spanners are perfect for finding objects to smash knuckles on that no one would have possibly thought in range.
 
As Jock says.
I also was taught to tighten in the orientation shown. Final tightening shoudl be done this way, flip it over for initial slackening. When moving freely, spanner can be used either way for access.
It shouldn't matter really, as both jaws should be strong enough to resist splaying. I guess the rule is very old, from when spanners were possible weaker, although they would have been rather fatter years ago.

If using an adjustable spanner, it might matter a lot. An adjustable spnner ini the orientation shown should only be tightening. Pressure on the adjustable jaw can lead to slip of breakage, of the spanner.
 
The crank on the handle should face the direction you are turning the bolt. The spanner jaws are stronger like that. Try it with vice grip pliers (Mole Grips) or water pump pliers and you'll see what I mean. Crack towards the turn and the jaws tend to be held shut by the tightening force, but levered open if you go the other way.

Think about your own hand and wrist on a jam jar lid. Tightening is easier right-handed with left hand better for loosening.
 
The crank on the handle should face the direction you are turning the bolt. The spanner jaws are stronger like that. Try it with vice grip pliers (Mole Grips) or water pump pliers and you'll see what I mean. Crack towards the turn and the jaws tend to be held shut by the tightening force.


Are you saying longer jaw at the back.. short jaw at the leading edge?
 
Are you saying longer jaw at the back.. short jaw at the leading edge?

I guess so. If you sit the bolt with a pair of flats at vertical - tightening would be best with spanner handle to right. For loosening its better to the left. I'm saying its best to set the handle leading the way you want to turn the fastener.

However, in a tight situation you can turn 1/2 a flat (30 degrees) with the spanner one way around then flip it over to turn the other 1/2 flat.
 
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Thanks folks.. :)

The poll results are interesting..
Not conclusive.. but a little thought provoking

As mentioned by others.. I have seen a few split jaws over the years in various workshops.
I thought they were over stressed by being
Worked too hard on a poor set.up :eek:

Over time I have suspected they probably failed through 'linking'.

Where you Extend the Spanner to double the leverage..

This tends to see action nowadays with auto tensioners with Aux. Drivebelts
Really poor access and high torque required.
 
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