A new pal for Becky

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A new pal for Becky

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Regular "lurkers" on the forum will know I've been rather unhappy with "Twinkle" - our Ibiza - for some time now. We've had a number of VAG products in the family from both SEAT and Skoda and all have been pretty good - with the exception of one which was my oldest boy's 1.6CR engined Fabia Scout - This experience was far outweighed by my SEAT Cordoba estate 1.9TDI VE engine which went on for about 20 years and just refused to die! Unfortunately the latest addition, bought 2016, was my Ibiza estate 1.0 TSI (EA 211 engine) which anyone who follows my posts will know about with it's turbo and gearbox problems but it also now has some other niggles and I've just lost confidence in it.

I've been blowing hot and cold with the idea of replacing it but putting off because it still goes acceptably well some of the time. However with the unfortunate recent death of my brother we are having to travel up and down from North Edinburgh to the Scottish borders where he lived and back several times a week to sort out his, rather complicated, affairs. I can see this going on for some time and it's a round trip of around 80 miles each time. The time is upon us to bite the bullet and get a new, or nearly new, car.

I've been looking at suitable replacements and turned up a few interesting prospects but whenever I looked more deeply at them I always seemed to run into something I really really didn't like. For instance dual mass flywheels, concentric clutch slave cylinders, "Wet" cam belts, cam chains with a bad reputation for giving problems and failing early, Electric hand brakes, and more. The list goes on and often the vehicles under consideration would have more than one of these "horrors".

So I ended up coming back to the SEATs and Skodas. After a lot of consideration, not just concerning the mechanicals but also what we needed for our purposes and that I fancied something with a more comfortable ride than the rather harsh Ibiza to cushion my old bones I ended up taking a drive in a standard SE spec (the FR has "sports" suspension) SEAT Arona with the mid spec 110Hp engine and the SE spec Skoda Scala with the same engine (I like conventional small estate cars and have fancied the Scala since I first saw one only a few months ago). Both would have been acceptable. Then it was time to get Mrs J into one and see what her preference might be.

There's a choice of two Skoda dealers near us and my instincts told me to go to the smaller one as I've heard good reports of them, however they only do the Skoda so we ended up at the, considerably nearer, multiple brand outlet where she could sit in both the Arona and Scala. Suffice to say she found both more than acceptable - Mrs J doesn't "do" getting excited about cars - but I found the Arona doesn't come with a spare wheel and there doesn't even seem to be the option to specify one. Also the standard wheel is quite big and with a comparatively low profile tyre (why low profile on an SUV?) One or two other minor and pretty insignificant items also put me against it - the fact it's a higher riding SUV being one of them.

So our very nice and long suffering salesman conducted us into the Skoda showroom and presented us with a Scala. It was the Monte Carlo version, bright red and very flashy. Many things I didn't want on it, like the large diameter wheels fitted with rubber bands for tyres and stupid amount of electronic extras and gizmos. for instance an electronic "virtual" dashboard which can be reconfigured in about 4 different ways and a display in the middle of the dash which was big enough to rival our TV back home. Unfortunately the sales chappy was well into his stride trying to sell it to Mrs J - should have told him he was on a looser there. Before I did my stint for about 5 years in car sales, the boss sent me on a full time study weeks course on car sales and the psychology behind it. I was most amused to see this chap following much of what I'd been taught. Started at the front of the car pointing out the "features" (all lost on Mrs J) led her down the N/S and around the back, opening the boot and pointing out the exceptional capacity of same. Then up the O/s where he opened the drivers door and invited her to sit in. All text book stuff done to perfection. At that point I couldn't hold the laughter back. He looked very puzzled so I had to explain to him why I was finding it funny. He too found it funny and from that moment on the ice was broken and we talked about his passion for old BMWs etc etc. Anyway, the Monte Carlo wasn't practical because it's deeply sculpted and very beautiful sports seats have such deep side "wings" that when the seat is far enough forward for Mrs J's short legs to work the pedals she then couldn't get out between the steering wheel and the side wings on the seat unless the seat was pushed rearward on it's runners. Good, that's the Monte Carlo eliminated - far too flashy a vehicle for me anyway.

So round the corner into a more general part of the showroom - the Monte Carlo had been in a more "intimate" setting - and we came across the other Scala display model, an SE-L. This is the "normal" top of the range spec. It's got lots of stuff in it I don't especially want but the seats etc are "normal" and Mrs J actually found them very comfortable and she like the car - in fact very similar to our existing Ibiza Estate, maybe 10 cm longer and a couple wider. Ok I'm interested in the SE spec with the 110hp engine, can we get a drive of one. No demonstrator but he might be able to find a used one we could try. Car found, trade plates attached, young salesman installed in rear seat and off we went. I want to try it through the traffic and out on the dual carriageway said I, Ok? Fine he said, so off we went, must have been away for best part of an hour. Slightly heavier car than the Ibiza with it's 95hp engine so the 110 hp in the Scala gives pretty much identical performance, possibly very slightly quicker. Ride is considerably more compliant on it's 205/55R16 Good Years but I suspect the springing and shockers are a little "softer", still well controlled in the corners though and very comfortable and quiet on the motorway. Still small enough to be handy and nippy in the town though. Yes, I thought, as we were turning into the garage parking area, One of these will do very nicely and, being VAG, I can still call on the expertise of my friends at AVW (our local VAG indy)

Back at the showroom our friendly salesman was hovering in wait (he later admitted that his sales target, for new and used, for that month is 27 vehicles and so far he's sold 12 - no wonder he was keen!) How did you like it? He asked. Very much I replied, have you got a low mileage SE spec with this 110hp engine maybe a year to 18 months old? Not at this branch but I'll check group stock for you. Oh dear, none in stock but I could let you know as soon as one comes in. Aronas are much more plentiful he said hopefully. Nope got to be a Scala. How about a new one? Used cars are at an all time high pricewise just now, you might get a surprise how affordable a new one can be? Ok, lets do the figures. I was astonished to find a new one with interest free credit etc, etc, came in at a price we could afford but no standard SE's immediately available and I don't want all the bells and whistles in the SEL, and it cost more. So I was about to walk, and he could see I was, so the old "hang on while I get the sales manager" ploy was deployed. Ok, lets see what he can come up with. Give him fair doos he was very nice and knew a lot about race cars so we got on well (careful Jock, remember he wants to sell you a car!) Amyway, after talking about the motor trade and swapping a few tales, I threw the "Pre Reg" towel into the ring. Ah, said he, though you wanted a new one? Nope, we were looking at used actually but a prereg would do very nicely. Took him a good 15 minutes on the computer to find one of the next month's allocation in the docks compound in Glasgow. It's the only one I can find in your preferred spec and it's in non metallic "Energy Blue" - like that Kamic over there he said pointing. Looks fine to me, in fact I rather like the shade and the fact it's not metallic for touch ups (didn't say that to him though) Trying not to look too enthusiastic I said, Ok, lets do the figure then, by the way what will you give me for the Ibiza? Nearly choked when he offered nearly £1,500 more than Peter, at the wee garage down the road from us had told me it was worth and had been in fact offered at the Renault garage against a Captur. When the figures were all done he was offering the prereg (sept 23 plate, don't ask) Scala 1.0 litre 110hp SE spec for £4000 under current list. I signed up. Now just got to wait till 28th Feb to take delivery.

Phone call. The car's here if you'd like to come by and view it. Confirming though that Skoda won't release the car to us/you until Feb28th. So this afternoon we went to inspect it.

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Oh yes, I'd been wondering how the non metallic paint would look but actually I really like it, thank goodness. Can't show you the front or rear as the plates are already on it. Then I found myself looking at the wheels. Oh, I like them, just like a slightly larger version of what's on the Ibiza, but hang on, the SE has cruder 5 spoke alloys doesn't it? The SE-L has wheels that look like this, oh damn, it's an SEL, they've made a mistake. But no, the SE-L has 17" wheels and these are 16" went through and looked at the SE-L in the showroom, similar but slightly different, strange? Then took a much closer look at it and it's a relatively rare SE "technology" spec car - half way between the SE and SE-L. Loaded with quite a lot of extra goodies the SE doesn't have but none of the "silly smart" stuff on the top SE-L. Rechecked with the salesman, Yes that's what it is and yes that's the car you've signed up for and bought. I'm absolutely cock a hoop!

Some more pictures now just to make you drool:

Nice big 195/60R16 spare - "proper" tyre although I think I can get an alloy with 205/55R16 in there. The well is certainly deep enough and the diameter is good but it may foul the rear trim (which you can't see at the bottom of the picture)

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Dash is analogue - which I wanted - and looks lovely with a very similar layout to my Ibiza:

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"Silly" big screen in the middle, which I could do without. Would be better with a nice row of analogue guages don't you think? Quite a nice light coloured trim underneath it though - don't get that on the standard SE

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Engine is recognizably from the same family as my Ibiza but there's more room under the bonnet so stuff like the air filter are better located and you can see the brake fluid reservoir for level checks. It's now got a big black oil separator/breather on top of the cam cover - no EGR on these engines:

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The top belt cover is now metal, was plastic on the Ibiza:

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And, for those who know their VAG EA211 engines, the twin thermostat/water pump assembly on the back end of the engine, which previously was plastic and was getting a name for warping and leaking when they aged, are now all metal! Yeah!

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One nice wee touch which made me laugh but is very practical, is the screen wash reservoir filler which fold out to form a funnel:

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So that's all for now folks. Bit over 4 weeks to go and I just can't wait, but nice to know it's sitting there waiting for me. Only thing is, having worked intimately on Twinkle the Ibiza for the last however many years, I'm feeling a bit of a traitor chopping her in for the new "cuckoo in her nest". I'll get over it though? Maybe?

PS Scala's got 9, Yes NINE miles on it's odo.
 
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Just please, dear God, don't let something horrific let go on the Ibiza before then!
My friend years ago when he was trading in his old Focus Titanium for an i40, took it one last time to an automatic car wash so it was clean for trade in. Windshield cracked down the middle during it - typical! Not sure if it was directly caused by the car wash or if that just happened to worsen an existing tiny crack but the bad luck!!!

I also was very nervous driving the Avensis that last week after signing for the new one in case anything happened… even cosmetic or minor. They didn’t seem to so much as look at it on the day… so there’s hope the dealers own ignorance might mean you get away if something minor does happen.

Interesting that they’ve changed so much from plastic to metal on that engine. That long term incremental recognising weak points and fixing them in the next iteration seems to be what built the Japanese brands reliabilities. Nice to see VAG learning and making differences rather than just starting from scratch with every generation and never learning from it like some other brands .. cough GM cough Citroen!
 
Thank you, I'm finding it hard waiting though!
Looks lovely Jock, 🙂
I had a similar scenario with my punto back in 2013
Supplied from "group stock", I was invited to check it when shipped to my local dealer (and I did) ,
but I waited 6 weeks to get the 1st of March - new year plate
11 years and counting, still very happy
hope yours serves you as well 👍
 
I remember when that EA211 engine came out they were proudly proclaiming that the cam belt was a "for life" fitment but the Uk dealerships quickly started advising everyone to do the "normal" 5 yearly change. They seem to be saying that this new generation engine is good for over 100,000 miles before the belt gets changed - wonder if they've thought about the idlers and tensioner bearings? Water pump doesn't come into it as it's on the back end of the head (other end of head, driven from the exhaust camshaft via a wee synchronous belt - which also has no recommended change interval.

Thanks one and all for the good wishes. Must say i don't really understand these "pre reg" release dates. I've been told I can't have the car until the 28th - even though, being a leap year the 29th is actually the last day of the month, and I've got to pick it up and settle the outstanding amount on that day (I'm buying it outright - no credit.) Got to be all done and dusted on that day? why?
 
I remember when that EA211 engine came out they were proudly proclaiming that the cam belt was a "for life" fitment but the Uk dealerships quickly started advising everyone to do the "normal" 5 yearly change. They seem to be saying that this new generation engine is good for over 100,000 miles before the belt gets changed - wonder if they've thought about the idlers and tensioner bearings? Water pump doesn't come into it as it's on the back end of the head (other end of head, driven from the exhaust camshaft via a wee synchronous belt - which also has no recommended change interval.
The last straw for my Avensis with the BMW engine was the ‘lifetime timing chain’ - notorious for snapping (due to plastic guides). Only people on BMW forums with over 200k miles were enthusiasts who changed them every 100/150k pre emptively. They posted before and after videos of idle sound. Toyota quoted me £3400 not including VAT for it and admitted not one of the customers they sold the cars to have ever had it done nor is it a standard job on their system. BMW were full of crap doing this. They said mounting it where it is reduced vibration…. But means an engine out job. Hogwash. I was disappointed to find that Toyota / Lexus claim the auto box fluid is ‘lifetime’ too. Many videos on YouTube of people replacing it, it comes out black not red well under 100k.

Lifetime seems to mean ‘during warranty period’.

It’s good to see that at least they are able to admit mistakes or at least learn from them and no longer make it the customers problem.

I hate to think of careful owners who believe doing everything by the book will mean lots of trouble free miles. But if even Lexus can make a ‘lifetime’ part claim, I don’t think I’ll ever trust the manufacturers ‘lifetime’ claims. Moving parts / liquids will never operate indefinitely without eventually failing.

I think the manufacturers are under pressure from governments to say ‘our cars need less maintenance (oil/materials) therefore we’re more green’. Stretching service intervals and making lifetime claims on parts. Surely early destroyed engines because of that is worse for the planet?!
 
I think the thing is if you search the internet for broken cars you will find them...or more precisely people complaining loudly about them.

German timing chains have a wonderful rep...they are one of the reasons the DS3 is thought of as unreliable given the Prince engine comprises a pretty much bomb proof old TU bottom end with BMW fuel injection and vanos style timing.

Oddly enough it lasted less time than the wet belts people also complain loudly about (usually after ignoring the service interval)...despite being a chain.

Vast majority of cars though must run reasonably well given it's pretty rare to see anyone parked up at the side of the road hazards on and the most common break downs are batteries and tyres.

Anywho, looks good Jock also welcome to 205/55 R16 life...it's a strange place where tyres are both reasonably priced and immediately available. For years with the Mazda and Suzuki the tyres cost a bomb and needed to be ordered and nevermind getting a choice between extra load or not. These days "can have a Goodyear Vector 4 seasons gen 3 in 205/55 16 91v?" "Certainly be here this afternoon"...or it's on the shelf. The old days "well we've got a choice of happy gallop double coin or waiting a week..."

Kinda wish it was slightly more "interesting" (not being insulting to it here) as I like the a lot of the more sensible things on them eg. actually having a damn spare...but there's no way in hell my wife would look at one and have any interest beyond "what else is there?". Shame as it's only a slightly bigger car than C3 with a bigger boot and interior and I'm sure would be very good at doing the same kinda job.
 
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The last straw for my Avensis with the BMW engine was the ‘lifetime timing chain’ - notorious for snapping (due to plastic guides). Only people on BMW forums with over 200k miles were enthusiasts who changed them every 100/150k pre emptively. They posted before and after videos of idle sound. Toyota quoted me £3400 not including VAT for it and admitted not one of the customers they sold the cars to have ever had it done nor is it a standard job on their system. BMW were full of crap doing this. They said mounting it where it is reduced vibration…. But means an engine out job. Hogwash. I was disappointed to find that Toyota / Lexus claim the auto box fluid is ‘lifetime’ too. Many videos on YouTube of people replacing it, it comes out black not red well under 100k.

Lifetime seems to mean ‘during warranty period’.

It’s good to see that at least they are able to admit mistakes or at least learn from them and no longer make it the customers problem.

I hate to think of careful owners who believe doing everything by the book will mean lots of trouble free miles. But if even Lexus can make a ‘lifetime’ part claim, I don’t think I’ll ever trust the manufacturers ‘lifetime’ claims. Moving parts / liquids will never operate indefinitely without eventually failing.

I think the manufacturers are under pressure from governments to say ‘our cars need less maintenance (oil/materials) therefore we’re more green’. Stretching service intervals and making lifetime claims on parts. Surely early destroyed engines because of that is worse for the planet?!
One of the many questions I asked yesterday was, did he, the salesman, know if the service regime was yearly/mileage based or extended interval. I remember having to ask them to change the service reminder on Twinkle (the Ibiza) from extended interval to yearly at her first service when she was a year old. He, the salesman, thought they come with it configured to extended interval by default but said he'd check for me. Didn't know if it could be changed before I take delivery as it's already been through the workshop and is actually ready for me to take now except of course I can't have it because of the - Skoda imposed? - delivery date of 28th Feb (still don't quite understand that). Your comments and observations above would seem to align with it being on an extended service regime by default. I would be doing an annual oil and filter change even if it was impossible to change her to a yearly regime.

Oh dear, I just had a thought. It's my "worst case scenario" frame of mind kicking in but I just thought, if she's ready to go now presumably she's going to sit in that back showroom space for the next month until I can collect her. So the battery will have a month of pretty much no starts or meaningful running and charging! worries me this could have implications for the longevity of the battery? Of course she's got the full manufacturer's new car warranty on her so if it fails in the next couple of years I may be able to claim a new one - or could I, are batteries a warranty item?
 
One of the many questions I asked yesterday was, did he, the salesman, know if the service regime was yearly/mileage based or extended interval. I remember having to ask them to change the service reminder on Twinkle (the Ibiza) from extended interval to yearly at her first service when she was a year old. He, the salesman, thought they come with it configured to extended interval by default but said he'd check for me. Didn't know if it could be changed before I take delivery as it's already been through the workshop and is actually ready for me to take now except of course I can't have it because of the - Skoda imposed? - delivery date of 28th Feb (still don't quite understand that). Your comments and observations above would seem to align with it being on an extended service regime by default. I would be doing an annual oil and filter change even if it was impossible to change her to a yearly regime.

Oh dear, I just had a thought. It's my "worst case scenario" frame of mind kicking in but I just thought, if she's ready to go now presumably she's going to sit in that back showroom space for the next month until I can collect her. So the battery will have a month of pretty much no starts or meaningful running and charging! worries me this could have implications for the longevity of the battery? Of course she's got the full manufacturer's new car warranty on her so if it fails in the next couple of years I may be able to claim a new one - or could I, are batteries a warranty item?
With it being a new car you’re covered. Give them one chance to ‘charge it’ if need be after any failed starts. If it happens soon after you’ll know the battery is done and you no longer need to accept them trying to recharge it. They should be able to replace it under the warranty. The Lexus I just bought used has been sitting around for at least a year… I seem to have gotten away with it as it seems to not depend on the 12v much but the ‘big’ battery seems to have been fine.

I think a new battery can go a few months with only the occasional start much better than a middle aged one that’s been at varying stages of charge, cold and hot weather cycles etc.

I know new cars have provisions from the manufacturer for things like ‘one free map update’ to ensure they leave the dealership with the customer having the latest maps should the new car have been sitting for a while. I’m sure batteries will have some sort of provision too where needed.

I’d say a few weeks won’t be anything to worry about. By the time you get it we’ll be well past our few weeks of ‘extreme winter’ conditions in the UK
 
Anywho, looks good Jock also welcome to 205/55 R16 life...it's a strange place where tyres are both reasonably priced and immediately available. For years with the Mazda and Suzuki the tyres cost a bomb and needed to be ordered and nevermind getting a choice between extra load or not. These days "can have a Goodyear Vector 4 seasons gen 3 in 205/55 16 91v?" "Certainly be here this afternoon"...or it's on the shelf. The old days "well we've got a choice of happy gallop double coin or waiting a week..."

Kinda wish it was slightly more "interesting" (not being insulting to it here) as I like the a lot of the more sensible things on them eg. actually having a damn spare...but there's no way in hell my wife would look at one and have any interest beyond "what else is there?". Shame as it's only a slightly bigger car than C3 with a bigger boot and interior and I'm sure would be very good at doing the same kinda job.
Yes, very pleased to now be in 205/55R16 land! I found out how easily available they are when we sourced replacements for my younger boy's old Astra which was on them. I also later came across a google saying they are the most common size in use in the UK today. His new (er) Audi A4 Avant (that means estate to us mere mortals) is on much bigger diameter and wider -225 - jobbies with far less compliant sidewalls, although not quite the "rubber bands" you see on some. I'll bet there'll be much less choice/availability on them. Haven't considered cost.

I absolutely "get" where you're wife's coming from regards the looks of the Scala, it's nothing that's going to particularly stand out in a crowd, although the front grill draws attention maybe? and my boy has already commented it's a bit like the newer BMWs? When younger I liked cars which stood out or were known for their performance, for instance the 1275 Cooper "S" I had back in the 60's. Nowadays I like a car which blends in seamlessly and doesn't draw attention from either the "boys in blue" or the thieves/vandals. I'm much more interested in the practicality - spare wheel and "sensible" design of mechanicals etc. In a way I'm lucky in that Mrs J just has no interest in our cars. She's commented in the past that she wishes we had a local dealer who specialized in pre-scratched cars with ready kerbrashed wheels but otherwise reliable oily bits. I know already she probably won't get behind the wheel of the Skoda until it's at least a year or so old and my initial enthusiasm for it has worn off just in case it gets a knock in the supermarket car park or she accidentally kerbs a wheel. Having said all that I actually think it's quite a "handsome" car?
 
Congrats on your new purchase Jock,

As discussed before this is a similar way to how I bought my Golf, so while I agreed to buy it in July it wasn’t till august it made it to the dealership, then they kept it in there storage till nearer September before they unwrapped it and PDI’d it, they then stood it in their indoor collection bay with the roof down till the day I picked it up, which was the 1st of September with the new reg. so while it sat around for over a month or so, and was probably a couple of months after leaving the factory, it is still on its original battery 8 years later. So I wouldn’t worry to much.
 
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I absolutely "get" where you're wife's coming from regards the looks of the Scala, it's nothing that's going to particularly stand out in a crowd, although the front grill draws attention maybe? and my boy has already commented it's a bit like the newer BMWs? When younger I liked cars which stood out or were known for their performance, for instance the 1275 Cooper "S" I had back in the 60's. Nowadays I like a car which blends in seamlessly and doesn't draw attention from either the "boys in blue" or the thieves/vandals. I'm much more interested in the practicality - spare wheel and "sensible" design of mechanicals etc. In a way I'm lucky in that Mrs J just has no interest in our cars. She's commented in the past that she wishes we had a local dealer who specialized in pre-scratched cars with ready kerbrashed wheels but otherwise reliable oily bits. I know already she probably won't get behind the wheel of the Skoda until it's at least a year or so old and my initial enthusiasm for it has worn off just in case it gets a knock in the supermarket car park or she accidentally kerbs a wheel. Having said all that I actually think it's quite a "handsome" car?

I'm not having a go as such I'd happily have had one as my car..but the politics of sharing a car mean it needs to come in a jazzy colour and look nice (not that it doesn't it needs to look nice to her if you know what I mean) etc.
 
I'm not having a go as such I'd happily have had one as my car..but the politics of sharing a car mean it needs to come in a jazzy colour and look nice (not that it doesn't it needs to look nice to her if you know what I mean) etc.
Exactly the criteria my wife goes by, hence why we’ve had nothing but minis since 2012
 
I'm not having a go as such I'd happily have had one as my car..but the politics of sharing a car mean it needs to come in a jazzy colour and look nice (not that it doesn't it needs to look nice to her if you know what I mean) etc.
Mrs J absolutely loves Becky our Panda and says she would have another one if anything ever happened to Becky. As long as I keep it clean and maintained so it starts and takes her where she wants to go, she's happy.
 
It's an odd world right now when a new car is cheaper than second hand, we've had that twice with Nissan.

It does look like an old man car, but you're no boy racer 😉

Ironically the analog dash is still digital, stepper motors drive the needles from the ecu bus.

The one concern I'd have long term is the 1.0 turbo engine. It was the one thing that annoyed me on the previous juke and why i wouldn't keep it long term.

Well done on choosing a car, something I'm seriously struggling with as mine gets on in age.
 
It's an odd world right now when a new car is cheaper than second hand, we've had that twice with Nissan.

It does look like an old man car, but you're no boy racer 😉

Ironically the analog dash is still digital, stepper motors drive the needles from the ecu bus.

The one concern I'd have long term is the 1.0 turbo engine. It was the one thing that annoyed me on the previous juke and why i wouldn't keep it long term.

Well done on choosing a car, something I'm seriously struggling with as mine gets on in age.
Thanks vex. I did take nearly 6 months to decide.

At 77 I suppose it's appropriate to my age, but I'm actually quite excited at the prospect of owning it and I quite like the anonymity I think it brings?

I know what you mean about the dash. Mind you a truly analogue dash probably hasn't existed for many years? but I don't need a dash which can be reconfigured in at least 4 completely different formats?

I've had a number of lengthy and in depth chats with my friend at AVW and he says the engines are proving to be remarkably trouble free. You don't really read of people having serious problems with them either although it's predecessor had lots of problems with pistons and timing chains. The EA211 went to a belt and the pistons don't seem to be a problem any more - he thinks they changed manufacturer as part of the solution? However I agree they are almost certainly not going to last like my old 1.9TDI did. Also so many auxiliaries now all of which could fail and be expensive to sort even though they are not internal parts of the actual IC engine. I'm not planning on keeping it for anything like as long as I did the Cordoba.
 
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