Is this the rarest modern Fiat available for sale in the UK right now ?

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Is this the rarest modern Fiat available for sale in the UK right now ?

AndyRKett

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How many left shows only 5 left on the road and only one SORN so a grand total of 6 cars left in the UK. I presume this is the SORN car, Definitely a Rare car, Would parts even be available? does it share common parts with cars such as the Panda ?
 
Very rare. Very few Argentas were sold here, and few were the injected model, most being carburetted. I had a 1984 carb Auto for a couple of years, until the rusty holes were appearing faster than I could fix them.
Very comfortable, lovely to drive, but a turning circle like a supertanker. A normal single carriageway road would need at least a 5-point turn. The double wishbone suspension didn't allow much angle for the front wheels. Got fed up with the sheer size of it. Replaced with a 750 classic Panda.

Almost nothing was interchangeable with other Fiats, apart from engine bits. It was a facelift of the 132, but had rear drums instead of discs. Very little of the 132 was carried over. There was a load sensing valve at the rear axle for the brakes. It looked the same as the 132, but was effectively a mirror image. When mine seized, had to buy a 132 item and rebuild mine with the internals of the 132. Loved it and hated it equally. Being rare prevents me buying another, so saving tears and heartache.
 
I've just noticed something with the picture, the ad says 1983 which would ususally make it either an Y or A reg depending on when it was registered but the car in the ad has a W registration which would be anything between 1st August 1980 - 31st July 1981
It is a left hand drive so presumably has been imported at some point?

It’s quite possible when it was imported it would be given a reg reflective of when it was build but not necessarily accurate? I have to confess im not sure on the process of registering an imported car but I seem to recall it is registered with the year it was roughly made ?
 
I think we need to discuss definitions, and 'modern' in particular :ROFLMAO:
Well its not a "classic car" its not tax exempt yet. It's modern in the context of having been built by robots and not hand built and is a square boxy utilitarian car rather than older cars that were made to look beautiful and curvy.

I appreciate it not "new" or "current" but I needed to draw the distinction between this and older classic fiats from before the 80s and 70s of which there are a number of "classic" coach built cars that are also very rare. Maybe in this case "mass produced" would be a better description.

The rarity factor seems to come from the fact no one considered them worth saving.
 
Well its not a "classic car" its not tax exempt yet. It's modern in the context of having been built by robots and not hand built and is a square boxy utilitarian car rather than older cars that were made to look beautiful and curvy.

I appreciate it not "new" or "current" but I needed to draw the distinction between this and older classic fiats from before the 80s and 70s of which there are a number of "classic" coach built cars that are also very rare. Maybe in this case "mass produced" would be a better description.

The rarity factor seems to come from the fact no one considered them worth saving.
50 years old. Modern... like it
 
It has that dreadful 70's British family car look to it. Rare doesn't mean good, some thing should be left to die in peace.
 
Very rare. Very few Argentas were sold here, and few were the injected model, most being carburetted. I had a 1984 carb Auto for a couple of years, until the rusty holes were appearing faster than I could fix them.
Very comfortable, lovely to drive, but a turning circle like a supertanker. A normal single carriageway road would need at least a 5-point turn. The double wishbone suspension didn't allow much angle for the front wheels. Got fed up with the sheer size of it. Replaced with a 750 classic Panda.

Almost nothing was interchangeable with other Fiats, apart from engine bits. It was a facelift of the 132, but had rear drums instead of discs. Very little of the 132 was carried over. There was a load sensing valve at the rear axle for the brakes. It looked the same as the 132, but was effectively a mirror image. When mine seized, had to buy a 132 item and rebuild mine with the internals of the 132. Loved it and hated it equally. Being rare prevents me buying another, so saving tears and heartache.
A friend of my dad's had one many years ago, Headlights were off a 131, as was the fuel tank etc, my old man said it was the first bad handling Fiat he'd driven, he's driven a few since but that was the first 😂 sounds like the 750 Panda was easier to live with, I love the original Panda's & would have one but there's hardly any left, my dad had a few 1000's when I was growing up, I've never experienced a 750 though
 
A friend of my dad's had one many years ago, Headlights were off a 131, as was the fuel tank etc, my old man said it was the first bad handling Fiat he'd driven, he's driven a few since but that was the first 😂 sounds like the 750 Panda was easier to live with, I love the original Panda's & would have one but there's hardly any left, my dad had a few 1000's when I was growing up, I've never experienced a 750 though
I had a 131 for four years before the Argenta, and that handled well. The Argenta was bigger, heavier, and softer, and meant as a big cruiser, not a sports car. It handled well. There were many times I drove it briskly, without any 'moments' or issues. It was easy to get the back end hanging out, especially on damp roundabouts, but this was always very easy to control. So, I'm not sure what your Dad was expecting, or what he found. No matter now, as neither of us are likely to experience another.

The 750 engine was revvier than the 1000, although this just mostly made enthusiastic noises, without much result. It was quite spritely, up to about 45mph, adequate from there to around 60, and anything beyond required patience. Despite this, my regular journeys from home to Bognor, 100 miles door-to-door, took much the same time as with the Argenta, although this did require more work. It had a 4-speed gearbox, although the handbook mentioned an optional 5-speed. I always thought a 5th gear would only be of use downhill. Overtakes needed notice in writing. We did do 48,000 miles in two years, always with a big smile.
 
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