2023 Vauxhall Grandland Courtesy Car... An Experience

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2023 Vauxhall Grandland Courtesy Car... An Experience

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Thought I'd share some thoughts here of a car I've been given for a few days, possibly a fortnight.. Some of you are owners of Fiat's plus other cars, others former owners, perhaps you'll have the chance or opportunity to consider something like this Vauxhall Grandland in the near future. Thought I'd chip in on what I think of it so far - it might be of interest, or maybe not.. either way:

I want to start with a positive - this isn't the worst car ever made. Far from it. And I certainly could have been given much worse! My experience is calibrated by my experience and appreciation of my 2005 Panda and 2017 Panda, then a decent spec DS3 (Citroen), some time with a high spec new Mercedes a couple of years ago (also an auto) and then my current Lexus CT (a fairly basic spec example too). I think this spectrum of cars has given me a decent perspective on the Grandland.

This is no Vauxhall, as many of you know, it's a firmly 'Stellantis' product. It looks much like a Peugeot 2008 akin to how the Skoda Fabia is a VW Polo, particularly if you're a distance behind one on the motorway during sundown, same silhouette.. Just with some modern Vauxhall styling. I don't think it's a particularly bad looking car. Vauxhall cars seem to have retained and evolved along the same tangent of exterior style that I think the final GM based cars were headed towards, I applaud Stellantis for making such an effort to try and keep them unique. Oddly, the rear quarter glass still has a 'GM' stamp on the glass. I think this was the first 'new' model after breaking off from GM.

The engine is the 1.2 turbo petrol. And it's reminiscent of the diesel 1.6 Avensis in that, for such a small engine, it doesn't feel weak to drive around such a bulky body. The turbo does a fairly good job. Three cylinders means it's not very refined at speed, nor efficient whatsoever. it's getting low 30s mpg on a 140 mile round trip this weekend. Combined with the auto gearbox, it's actually low speeds where the car delivers its worst performance. It's choppy, clunky with the gear changes and in start-stop bumper to bumper traffic (the very place where an auto justifies its place!) it's the worst. There is a rough shudder throughout the car, similar to a poorly used manual clutch at a speed prior to the car stalling, except the stall never comes and a tap on the brake abruptly ends it by activating start/stop - stopping the car instantly, jolting the body forward a bit. You can feel and see your passengers jolt forward every time. OR, upon the low rolling shudder, you put your foot down on the accelerator to continue, and after about a second of nothing it will jump into gear and roughly plough forward at speed. It feels like whatever you need it to do, you initiate, and then have to double down to get it to spring into action. I was always of the belief that a 'bad auto' was still better than changing gears, but I think now I agree with the owner criticisms and reviews when they insult auto gearboxes. That diesel Merc had probably one of the best auto gearboxes, barely felt it at any stage and it always was in the right position (seemingly). I've driven a relatives auto Mazda 6 which gets a fair bit of criticism, it's certainly a bit clunkier than the Merc was, but nothing like this. In summary, the engine / gears stop this car from what I'd call 'nice to live with'.

This is the highest spec 'Ultimate' model. I was utterly shocked to find it RRPs at £37,000+ as configured. It has every feature I can think of, with the exception of a glass sun/roof. Radar cruise control, heated steering wheels (heated seats and CarPlay!), that 'self driving' thing where you just need to keep your hands on the wheel every two minutes, power tailgate with the foot wave activation, digital dash, drive modes, 360 parking cam... nearly everything on a modern specced out car. On paper you'd think this is the real deal, an arguably stylish (by today's standards, not mine), well equipped, auto, safe, spacious car - but in reality the rough ride, poor refinement and clunky drive feel let it down. Interestingly, the very exact same grade / texture of cheap, scratchy plastic is everywhere below the shoulders in this cars interior, as in the 2004 Corsa C interior I drove after passing my test. The nicer stuff must be reserved for the Peugeot / Citroen variants.

When I looked up the cost, I was shocked as I pictured this would be mid / higher 20k mark - after all, the term 'SUV' aside, this is, a modern people carrier in effect. It leans around corners like a people carrier, it's got an absurdly high roof inside like a people carrier. I think the marketers have ran rings around us consumers by banishing the 'Zafiras' and 'Scenics' and styled it like a mini off roader come 'crossover', and they're marking up the price accordingly, have normalised 2wd as 'cost saving' and voila, we have the Grandland and it's competitors. All selling like hotcakes too! I wrote this off to being part of the inflation / gradual increase of cars both new and used over time. Especially in recent years. The insult to injury with this car (and cars like it) is that, you can buy a specced out Lexus UX crossover (with other fancy things like a heated steering wheel) for the same money. That's where I think buyers are getting shafted, arguably, if you just wanted features instead of a 'better badge' for the same cost, I'd understand the choice of the consumer to choose one or the other, but this car has a lot of poor qualities, the kind which will kick you every day you live with it, so to know a smoother, more reliable, faster car for the same price is out there - and probably a tonne of others from the usual big name brands.

If nothing else, I would say this just serves as a reminder that if any of you are considering a new car and you're solely going by price point, or solely going by a list of features you want, please, PLEASE take the time to test drive all of your options. Because to spend £37k on this experience is cruel. In the past I assumed that price point was a fairly rough guide on what to expect in that you can probably buy something equivalent from another make... if you bought a Alfa Romeo MiTo instead of a Fiat Punto, you probably could have chosen a higher spec Punto with more bells and whistles over an entry MiTo... or a used, high spec MiTo for the cost of the basic Punto. For every 'give' on one choice, there was a 'taken' feature or benefit. Seems like nowadays, there are options like draining your wallet like a premium car without giving you your full money's worth. If this car was priced like its badge one time would have suggested, as a value choice, I could forgive some of it's rough edges. I hope none of you end up in this situation (if you were to purchase something like this). It was a shock to me.

Final word on this, I think it reminds me what I admire about the Fiat's I owned. The word 'unassuming' or 'honest' is used a lot by people describing them. They are what they are. A lot of people expect much less from them, then they perform above expectation. I certainly had my doubts a decade ago about ever owning a Fiat only to be proven wrong and end up being somewhat of a fanatic over them. I think the opposite is true of the Grandland and many cars in this class, for sale today, I think a lot of hardworking people (or even old people, retired, looking for something to enjoy via Motability or whatever it is) will opt for a car like this, which promises everything on their wishlist only to be disappointed where 120+ years of automotive engineering has gotten us. And in case anybody is wondering (and made it this far)... motorcyclist drove into the back of my CT on Easter weekend (insurance agreed, not at fault) claims company sorted me out with this car whilst it's away. No injuries thankfully. I miss it already.
 

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Think my takeaways from that would be...

Get a manual lower spec and it'll be alreet.

Also no one has ever paid 37k for one of these I assume given Vauxhall prices remain malleable. You could pick up a very similar car with 300 miles on it for about 12k less so I'd imagine the pre-reg Vauxhall effect is strong.

Also one point of reference you may have missed a base model VW Tiguan is 35k...so while this is fully kitted out spec for spec it's probably getting on for 10k less than a similarly specced Rival. The smaller Mercedes GLA comes with a similarly crap 1.3 engine and drive for a starting price of 36 grand both those prices are zero options and Tiguan may even be a manual.

So while it's an expensive car to you (and in general) in class it's a cheap one for the class and size of vehicle.

Some might say... they're all awful so they might as well be cheap.
 
Ahh. You lucky so and so. A preview of the new Fiat Panda.

Crossland is another Vectra type. It does its job. But nothing more. I would sooner walk. A horse looks good too.

Yes I like your test drive advice. I would add too look at service and parts prices and insurance, and even tyres. Some sizes are really silly prices. (Panda 4x4) If you go left field go and ask for a few things, a headlight, windscreen fuel pump and see if they can be produced within 6 months too.

I dont like mainstream, but it has benefits.
 
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It's an appliance, no more, no less. Nobody pays £37K because they pay monthly to drive it, of course.

I won't say what the least honest car is I have driven as it might upset the OP, but afterwards I was still committed to going hybrid, so ordered a Prius, which was excellent - in an appliance-like manner!
 
The grandland was supposed to be the replacement for the antara, another abomination.

The drive for fake mpg and emission is definitely killing most cars off. All these 3 cylinder small turbo engines seem very lumpy and unrefined compared to cars we used to drive.
 
Think my takeaways from that would be...

Get a manual lower spec and it'll be alreet.

Also no one has ever paid 37k for one of these I assume given Vauxhall prices remain malleable. You could pick up a very similar car with 300 miles on it for about 12k less so I'd imagine the pre-reg Vauxhall effect is strong.

Also one point of reference you may have missed a base model VW Tiguan is 35k...so while this is fully kitted out spec for spec it's probably getting on for 10k less than a similarly specced Rival. The smaller Mercedes GLA comes with a similarly crap 1.3 engine and drive for a starting price of 36 grand both those prices are zero options and Tiguan may even be a manual.

So while it's an expensive car to you (and in general) in class it's a cheap one for the class and size of vehicle.

Some might say... they're all awful so they might as well be cheap.
Good point about the whole negotiating a discount, I noticed form Vauxhall email newsletters and ads they push the 0% thing a lot, so must be systemically factored in with the pricing structure. At a lower price, I could forgive a lot of this.

I'm surprised about the Tiguan, though given that you could be driving a Lexus for the same price (and not a base spec one) I'd argue the Tiguan verges on overpriced, but I don't doubt that loyal VAG fans would pay it. If the Grandland didn't start at 31k for a base, I'd also sort of give it a bit less criticism! Back in 2021, that not-far-off top spec CLA as configured, was 37k. I understand inflation, but 3 years from buying one of those new, versus this, or even a Tiguan (although I concede that it would be better in nearly every measure than this Grandland), seems like buyers get a lot less car for the money in just three years.

The brand new Lexus (same class / size of car) and as I said above, comparison to the CLA sort of car, both 'luxury' brands, is what fuels my criticism most though. Am I missing something else other than the fact that these would be bargained way, way down at the dealership?

Ahh. You lucky so and so. A preview of the new Fiat Panda.

Crossland is another Vectra type. It does its job. But nothing more. I would sooner walk. A horse looks good too.

Yes I like your test drive advice. I would add too look at service and parts prices and insurance, and even tyres. Some sizes are really silly prices. (Panda 4x4) If you go left field go and ask for a few things, a headlight, windscreen fuel pump and see if they can be produced within 6 months too.

I dont like mainstream, but it has benefits.
Ahh the Vectra, I can remember being in primary school and kids who used to watch Top Gear repeating jokes about that!!!

Very good questions for a buyer akin to many of us on here, who want to do their own maintenance and keep the car. I presume for most of the new car buyers (of these things) they only want it for 3 years maximum. The engine parts / filters are probably all easy to source and cheap as a benefit of sharing the powertrain with many Peugeot derived cars. As you say though, trim pieces, specific bits for this model (this facelift of this model) will probably be hard to come by

Is it made in Korea, like so much of the old GM kit was?
I had a Quick Look on Wikipedia, apparently this one is made in multiple places:

France: Sochaux (PSA Sochaux Plant)
Germany: Eisenach (Opel Eisenach)
Namibia: Walvis Bay (POAN)


...Made in Germany?! ...*gasp* I'll say no more ;-)

It's an appliance, no more, no less. Nobody pays £37K because they pay monthly to drive it, of course.

I won't say what the least honest car is I have driven as it might upset the OP, but afterwards I was still committed to going hybrid, so ordered a Prius, which was excellent - in an appliance-like manner!
Very much an appliance like experience. As this week goes on, I am beginning to get used to and not be so aware of things like the leaning in the corners / roundabouts and the roughness / noise of the thing in motion. The slow stopping / moving off in traffic remains the most annoying thing which I don't think will go away. I'm blaming this mostly on Stop/Start as the car sort of tries to avoid shutting off until you really come to a stop or hit the brakes hard, once you do, you feel like you need to force down the accelerator to get it to snap back into action. It's the least smooth / pleasant start/stop experience I've had. Unlike every other ICE car I've driven, I don't see any clear physical (or software) button to disable start/stop on this.

Now I'm curious, what was the least honest?! haha I'll mentally prepare for your answer to be a Fiat or Japanese haha

Hybrids are the way forward I think. Just learnt that Toyota has various different Hybrid setups. The mainstream one we have on most of the cars. Then one for the 4x4 models less on efficiency more on handling the all wheel drive systems. And then another that they have mostly in high end Lexus models which is used to be a bit more powerful feeling / sporty and less on efficiency. I thought they were all the same and thus ruled out Lexus for the likes of Merc / BMW loyal fans, and the reviews still do say that on sheer sporting and extreme performance to avoid even a high end Lexus, but it's interesting that the technology can be applied for different outcomes. They're on something now like close to 200hp, and close to 80mpg real world in the latest generation... frankly, I don't see the progress slowing down. Imagine if the carmakers put the R&D from BEV tech into that and not just basically Toyota and Hyundai... we could be seeing some crazy good cars in all categories. ...isn't LaFerrari technically a hybrid?!

The grandland was supposed to be the replacement for the antara, another abomination.

The drive for fake mpg and emission is definitely killing most cars off. All these 3 cylinder small turbo engines seem very lumpy and unrefined compared to cars we used to drive.
The Antara.. I remember that from the Vauxhall configurator and then every so often, spotting a tatty one in the wild. That had very strong American GM bland vibes about it. Pretty expensive, if not the most expensive normal car Vauxhall sold in the UK when it was on sale wasn't it? Still, I saw that more like a 4x4. This thing, the Grandland, doesn't feel like that at all. It feels like a more polished Peugeot 2008. A big deep container with a high centre of gravity that you're very much stuck in, and every time you turn a corner, you're reminded it's a big, bulky, clumsy people carrier.. I thought these new crossover 'SUV' things would feel a bit more composed.
 
With an awful lot of modern cars the sweet spot is quite far down the range these days.

Given standard equipment on pretty much all of them is equal to top spec from 10 years ago going up the tree just tends to bring things that bong, the option to adjust whether or not you want your interior to look like a window in the Amsterdam red light district and extra scorchio headlamps.

Cruise, parking sensors, electric windows, a.c., all the safety gear will be standard fit from top to bottom of the range.

At mid 20s with a manual and none of jazzy bits it'll be a far better thing. Even the stop start...as with a manual it lets you get on with it so unless you raise the clutch in neutral it will idle for ever. Stop start integration on autos tends to be terrible regardless of who designed it as the car has no idea if it's stopped for a second or 10 minutes.

In fact mid 20s might be a bit high..yes its a year and a half old.

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Or alternatively for the same money as the 1.2 as specced a mid-spec 1.6 hybrid with the electric 4wd system would probably be far more competent at traffic given it can actually move under electric power.

Although of course regardless of which choice is made the end result is a Grandland 🤮
 
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With an awful lot of modern cars the sweet spot is quite far down the range these days.

Given standard equipment on pretty much all of them is equal to top spec from 10 years ago going up the tree just tends to bring things that bong, the option to adjust whether or not you want your interior to look like a window in the Amsterdam red light district and extra scorchio headlamps.

Cruise, parking sensors, electric windows, a.c., all the safety gear will be standard fit from top to bottom of the range.

At mid 20s with a manual and none of jazzy bits it'll be a far better thing. Even the stop start...as with a manual it lets you get on with it so unless you raise the clutch in neutral it will idle for ever. Stop start integration on autos tends to be terrible regardless of who designed it as the car has no idea if it's stopped for a second or 10 minutes.

In fact mid 20s might be a bit high..yes its a year and a half old.

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Or alternatively for the same money as the 1.2 as specced a mid-spec 1.6 hybrid with the electric 4wd system would probably be far more competent at traffic given it can actually move under electric power.

Although of course regardless of which choice is made the end result is a Grandland 🤮
22k is what the base model of this thing should be. 27k I reckon, with all the kit this one has a fair price for what you actually get. Passed one this evening identical, white, same wheels / trim. All I could think was "Poor b****rd, probably paid hard earned cash for that thing".

I find it funny that every time you start it it says "Engine oil OK", as if the owner, at every start up, can't be reasonably sure on their own that the oil is in fact, okay...

So the regulars I have in my car initially liked it and joked about the repairers 'keeping the Lexus' - most of em don't drive, so talking about driving aspects to them doesn't seem to register. They just see CarPlay, heated seats and whatnot, and they think it's superior. But after over a week, even they're fed up with the choppiness, the leaning / body roll and the severe noise at any kind of speed. They also look at me as if to say "what the hell are you doing" when the engine roars as the car accelerates at a fairly slow pace, to a fairly middle speed. Even they are seeing through the equipment list.

I have waves of thinking that my thoughts on the car are incredibly ungrateful and over-exaggerated. But then I drive it, it's all going along smoothly. Then comes the first set of traffic lights / slow traffic. There it is, throwing me about. Then comes the green light and the car moving off in front, I gently push the accelerator, nothing really happens, the person behind has already exceeded the 'few seconds' of patience before they expect me to be moving off behind the car in front. I have to push it noticeably harder, the car jolts forward as if I've disturbed the gearbox and it had to quickly do the mechanical equivalent of unmuting its mic on Teams after not following anything going on around it... And just this evening, leaving someone to the airport, it introduced a new one "Radar cruise not available due to conditions". Gave me a flashback to the DS3 and it's front sensors not liking the rain and constantly telling me about that... I thought, fine, and tried to set the standard cruise, only to find that doesn't seem to be an option - it's radar, or nothing. Then back to usual, the fuel light came on and another £25 out of the bank account and into the 32mpg monstrosity.

I appreciate that on paper, someone at the claim management company probably looked at some comparison tool and thought "this one has a high spec, looks decent, plenty of space, popular drivetrain" and no doubt a more competitive offer than the equivalent Skoda or other box-checking car for their fleet, but I wish they'd taken some company time to drive the cars themselves first. I'm reminded that there are infinitely worse cars on the road... I couldn't imagine being stuck with some Hyundai / Kia SUV thing or bottom of the barrel MG... Probably won't be long until they are undercutting the usual fleet car suppliers on our roads. Someday, I'll be wishing I got a Skoda Citigo courtesy car over an MG ZS or whatever the CCP are calling them by then!!! hahaha

I called up last week to check on the Lexus. Parts ordered (or in the process of being ordered). Whilst I'm happy that they agreed to use genuine parts, I think that it took two months to get a bumper / doors for the DS3...... a much more popular car. I fear this Grandland could be here for quite a while.
 
Radar cruise thing...again this is where the cheap one is better it's just got standard cruise.

Stop start is always awful on an auto unless it's got a hybrid set up to allow move off while the engine is actually firing up. It's certainly not Grandland specific as I've seen many another car come to momentarily halt stop immediately and then start immediately. It just seems so abusive to the starter and and engine.

We've got the same engine it starts fast enough that the time it takes to depress the clutch is enough for it to fire and settle. The issue is it doesn't know you want to move until you ask it to move in the auto and unlike the hybrid versions has no ability to move until its fired.

This power-train is dead anyway replaced by a similar powered hybrid with a DSG which is apparently much more competent except in the Grandland which is going to be replaced this summer so was not re-engineered to accept it as a waste of time.

This is why I expect the hire company has this car in this spec..they probably asked for a base spec one and got this for no additional charge as they'd never sell it to a punter in a million years and it in 2 months it's not the current shape and has the worst powertrain available.
 
Radar cruise thing...again this is where the cheap one is better it's just got standard cruise.

Stop start is always awful on an auto unless it's got a hybrid set up to allow move off while the engine is actually firing up. It's certainly not Grandland specific as I've seen many another car come to momentarily halt stop immediately and then start immediately. It just seems so abusive to the starter and and engine.

We've got the same engine it starts fast enough that the time it takes to depress the clutch is enough for it to fire and settle. The issue is it doesn't know you want to move until you ask it to move in the auto and unlike the hybrid versions has no ability to move until its fired.

This power-train is dead anyway replaced by a similar powered hybrid with a DSG which is apparently much more competent except in the Grandland which is going to be replaced this summer so was not re-engineered to accept it as a waste of time.

This is why I expect the hire company has this car in this spec..they probably asked for a base spec one and got this for no additional charge as they'd never sell it to a punter in a million years and it in 2 months it's not the current shape and has the worst powertrain available.
Spot on. I think this engine is definitely more suited to a manual.

Just saw the all new replacement Grandland. More range than a Tesla! I think now the big car companies have caught up and whilst the current generation EVs are hit and miss in terms of range, the next wave are looking a LOT better...

It got me thinking though, with the Grandland I've had, being available also as a hybrid, also as an EV... maybe that's where the R&D money went. And also where the real performance 'nice' elements like less roaring sounds come in.

I'll never understand the auto-options car makers go with. The Avensis had the 2.0 and 1.6 diesels, no doubt the ones buyers favoured in the 2010s... but if you wanted an auto, it was a petrol (non turbo I think) with a CVT, which I hear is even worse outside of the hybrid 'e-cvt'. Then I remember spending ages on the Panda configurator / AutoTrader and seeing the TwinAir was the only option for auto, or 4x4 / Cross models. Given that the technology for the auto-box on the 1.2 already existed and the differences between the 2003 and 2011 models are minimal, I'm not sure why they didn't make that an option..

My biggest lesson with this Grandland is: a cheap premium car void of all options is a better experience than a pricy, ultra-high-spec budget car - even if it can drive itself.

Just got a call as I was typing this to say the CT is ready for collection. This experience is officially over! PLEASE, if you are on the Fiat Forum, you are into cars at least enough to want to read / discuss them on here, then you are already 'too much of a car person' to ever truly enjoy something like this. I've been a bit dramatic... but I don't think you'll find Fiat levels of charm or honesty in something as this Grandland. And if it's fast Alfa's, or a Maserati sort of background you come from, you'll equally be as disappointed buying this!
 
Vauxhall went bland from the early 2000s, nothing new there. There engines are like most new engines, they do the job but nothing special or no character, even the vxr ones, just do their job with a bit more power.
 
The other elephant in the room on this one is this car was the first car Vauxhall developed on a Stellantis platform and it was pre the PSA merger.

So there's a reasonable chance there was very little knowledge sharing as at the time they were a separate company. There would be pretty much no costs associated with platform and powertrain development as it was all already built however the set up of getting the bits to work together may well not have travelled into what was at the time a competitor leaving Vx to figure it out. Given the 3008 was very much the goose that laid the golden egg back then I doubt there was an appetite for a good competitor on the same underpinnings but cheaper.

From the sounds of it they took the view this is a replacement for the Zafira and Antara..they are both awful, is it slightly less awful? Yes ok out the door it goes.

Kinda like the 600e is a bit cack as it appears they've grabbed most of an avenger and stuck it under summat that looks like a 500x. Very much the feel of you could have done more with that...with the time and inclination.
 
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From the sounds of it they took the view this is a replacement for the Zafira and Antara..they are both awful, is it slightly less awful? Yes ok out the door it goes.
This is what winds me up about it, people call it an SUV... but it's genuinely Zafira like in how it drives... how it's shaped... low floor height. Where on earth does this thing (and other "crossovers") get off, calling its self an SUV? I thought SUVs were at least the size of a 'small 4x4' car. The Panda Cross is a city car, slightly raised up, with SUV styling, but make no mistake, it's hardly what I'd call an 'SUV' as much as I like them. Same with this new 'Aygo X', SUV style it all night, it's still the same level of practicality / size really, give or take a few mm of ride height.

I've been parking this Grandland outside the front of the office as I don't want to risk damaging it in the tight multi-storey at work. On the way out this afternoon the cleaner complimented the car saying "I love your car, it's beautiful". She must have seen me walk in coming from it. I couldn't tell her quick enough that it's just a courtesy car and that I think it looks alright, but it's terrible to drive! She was shocked but had mentioned her partner has some Jaguar SUV thing. I said to her, if she sat in the Grandland while moving for 30 seconds she'd know what I meant being used to the Jaguar! But it just shows you, to the general uninitiated public, they seem to ... admire it?!

Picked up the CT this afternoon. So glad to have it back. Immediately quieter and smoother setting off. Steering wheel (whilst unbearably shiny from years of use) feeling much thicker and more supple to the touch. Absolutely no equipment relative to the Grandland other than a fairly un-intuitive fixed infotainment screen. On the dual-carriageway, the e-cvt 'noise' that comes from pushing it is nothing relative to the noise of that 3-cylinder in the Grandland, especially once it eventually changed gear akin to swallowing a large pill on a dry throat.. Very happy to have it back.

I won't miss the Grandland. Should I end up needing a courtesy car in the future, I'll probably say nothing and see what they give me. Asking for an automatic is likely why I was given it. It means that no matter what happens in the future, should I be faced with buying a relatively new, higher spec Corsa or something, versus a slightly older higher end car with a lot less kit, I'd probably go for the 'nicer' car rather than the newer one.

Speaking of that... some people never learn. My friend I've referenced on here a few times with the i30N was faced with another £1,600+ repair bill (not covered by warranty) and ended up trading it in. He bought an MH HS... appalling car. He's done exactly what the Grandland has taught me against, bought a fresher / under 1 year old car, with a long list of equipment with absolutely zero build quality or longevity. Now, compared to a modern MG, the Grandland might as well be a hand assembled Bentley in quality, drive and refinement!
 
I've been parking this Grandland outside the front of the office as I don't want to risk damaging it in the tight multi-storey at work. On the way out this afternoon the cleaner complimented the car saying "I love your car, it's beautiful". She must have seen me walk in coming from it. I couldn't tell her quick enough that it's just a courtesy car and that I think it looks alright, but it's terrible to drive! She was shocked but had mentioned her partner has some Jaguar SUV thing. I said to her, if she sat in the Grandland while moving for 30 seconds she'd know what I meant being used to the Jaguar! But it just shows you, to the general uninitiated public, they seem to ... admire it?!

Perhaps this is a case of knowing the market.

It can drive like utter crap because the target market don't care, as long as the monthly is low, it's big enough for their stuff and it's got gadgets to show their friends also doesn't leave them at the side of road and looks fancy, it's a good car.

Some might say money making it drive properly is wasted as no one expects that from a VX SUV, people who'd notice wouldn't buy it anyway and people who would consider the car give little thought as to what a good car drives like.

A car can be entirely terrible and still be acceptable transport.

7 years ago at this point my wife wandered past all the supermini options and bought literally the worst driving option available.. because she liked it, the monthly payment was right and unlike all the other options it was vaguely interesting.
 
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I was behind a grandland on the way into work, it's quite a chunky monkey from the back.

I dont get the range of cars now, grandland, crossland, mokka, all seem to look the same other than a few cosmetic tweaks, even the astra is becoming the same. And probably the same cars that's across other platforms now
 
I was behind a grandland on the way into work, it's quite a chunky monkey from the back.

I dont get the range of cars now, grandland, crossland, mokka, all seem to look the same other than a few cosmetic tweaks, even the astra is becoming the same. And probably the same cars that's across other platforms now
The same because that's what the punters now expect. In a Vauxhall Dealership near you:

"I want a rufty-tufty looking piece of driveway ornamentation like that big one there and I have £xxx to spend per month. Eh? I dunno about any drivetrain Mr Salesman, aren't they all them 4x4s these days anyway, you know, rufty-tufty, tall, kind of aggressive looking? I can't afford that really big one? OK, well what about that ever-so-slightly smaller one over there, it looks the same anyway, so can I afford that one? Great, in that nice blue, yes. Here's my credit card for my first 3 months payment"
 
I dont get the range of cars now, grandland, crossland, mokka, all seem to look the same other than a few cosmetic tweaks, even the astra is becoming the same. And probably the same cars that's across other platforms now
I remember people saying that in the 2000s about the Corsa D and the Astra at the time, especially the 3 doors. Same with the Golf / Polo's as well, before I was 'into' cars, I'd barely be able to tell them apart. Now I know it's a class so better handling / more power / more equipment options etc. Before that I would have thought why buy an Astra if you can get a Corsa in top spec, I'd also not have cared (or known much) about engines so I could see that being the case for the general public.

Probably is just 'how much do you have to spend', matched to the highest model up the range as said above
 
Price walking is what most manufacturers do.

You start your PCP with something small and before you know you're 3 cars deep and have paid 40k in 10 years to own nothing.

It's a very successful business model.

You start off, fresh faced and out of university with a base spec Vauxhall Adam which is only 150 per month which you can afford on your trainee salary.

When this comes to end you've got your first proper job and well you can afford a bit more so you get a mid range Corsa.. because the Adam was fine but you wanted something bigger. Your monthly payment also gets bigger but hey it's only 50 quid a month you can afford that no bother.

This agreement comes to end, you like the Corsa but there's a baby on the way so you need something bigger but not huge..the salesman points you in the direction of a Mokka and as the Corsa was entirely fine and this is bigger but largely reminds you of it you sign on the line. You've had a few payrises since the Corsa so you get the fancy wheels and get the turbo this time and it adds another 75 quid but hey you can afford it.

This continues..until either you have a terrible car and swear off them for life, something actually turns your head or you have a large change of circumstances.

If you have 5 cars in the range and all of them have nothing in common then what you like about 1 is not necessarily transferable up or down the range.

So yes...the cars will all have common features it's generally a component of corporate identity in a model range and yes they will come in different sizes to suit different circumstances. The idea being you keep customers within your brand rather than forcing them to go elsewhere because your model range consists of 2 superminis which are 3 and 5 door versions of the same car, a weird budget hatchback from Turkey a huge price jump to an SUV type thing and then oddly a Rebadged Mitsubishi L200..and some Rebadged vans.
 
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