Your most historic tool

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Your most historic tool

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So what's your most historic tool? Post a pic if you have one.

Mine is a breaker bar i bought around the year 2000. Its been all the way to Australia and back. Its still perfectly good and was in use today!

IMG20240307100002.jpg
 
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So what's your most historic tool? Post a pic if you have one.

Mine is a breaker bar i bought around the year 2000. Its been all the way to australia and back. Its still perfectly good and was in use today!

View attachment 439634
In 1970 I got an award for being the best practical student of my year, along with name in the local paper and a £5. prize of tools. Big deal some may say, but £5 in those days bought a set of six of each Whitworth, A/F and Metric combination spanners in Brittool, most of which somewhere in my garage I still have. The Whitworth fitted the old British motorbikes which were all I could afford at the time as everyone was buying Japanese, but they also fitted older Morris etc. we still worked on, the A/F fitted all the then current Fords etc. and the Metric was just starting to become more popular, so are still in use today.
I also have a pair of American Proto molegrips from around the same time which I bought from a tool guy who used to sell from his car in those days. They cost me 30 bob(£1.50 to you youngsters) at the time the older mechanics said I was stupid as a genuine pair of Mole Grips was 19/6d (just under £1) However they still work, all be it modified and grip well.
I couldn't find the news paper cutting, but this was when the award was and just to give you a laugh, check my starting pay per 40 hour week as an apprentice.:)
My mum said "get yourself an apprenticeship and you will never be out of work", apart from holidays out of work two weeks since 1969 until I retired. I was only out of work the two weeks as I jacked that job in as no pay rise, signed on "unemployed" and got £7 one week and £9 the second week, then offered another job at a 1/3rd wage increase. In all that time I have never needed to apply for a job and went self employed in 1982.
 

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In 1970 I got an award for being the best practical student of my year, along with name in the local paper and a £5. prize of tools. Big deal some may say, but £5 in those days bought a set of six of each Whitworth, A/F and Metric combination spanners in Brittool, most of which somewhere in my garage I still have. The Whitworth fitted the old British motorbikes which were all I could afford at the time as everyone was buying Japanese, but they also fitted older Morris etc. we still worked on, the A/F fitted all the then current Fords etc. and the Metric was just starting to become more popular, so are still in use today.
I also have a pair of American Proto molegrips from around the same time which I bought from a tool guy who used to sell from his car in those days. They cost me 30 bob(£1.50 to you youngsters) at the time the older mechanics said I was stupid as a genuine pair of Mole Grips was 19/6d (just under £1) However they still work, all be it modified and grip well.
I couldn't find the news paper cutting, but this was when the award was and just to give you a laugh, check my starting pay per 40 hour week as an apprentice.
My mum said "get yourself an apprenticeship and you will never be out of work", apart from holidays out of work two weeks since 1969 until I retired. I was only out of work the two weeks as I jacked that job in as no pay rise, signed on "unemployed" and got £7 one week and £9 the second week, then offered another job at a 1/3rd wage increase. In all that time I have never needed to apply for a job and went self employed in 1982.

Blimey you were paid £3.

Its nice to see momentos such as this!
 
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Not something I use now but anyone like to hazard a guess what their purpose would have been in the vehicles tool kit.
 

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Not something I use now but anyone like to hazard a guess what their purpose would have been in the vehicles tool kit.
I am guessing the Hexagon drive was for a socket set adaptor as many didn't use 1/2 inch square drive.
Other than that rocker adjusters on an older overhead cam arrangement?
 
This is the closest I could find for it. Website claims it's a spark plug and cylinder head bolt wrench for a Model T Ford.


Spanner.jpg

 
LOL.

My own son is 15. I'm not convinced he'd be doing much useful in a garage for several months/years if he started at that age LOL.
Trouble is these days the pressure is on, and the other mechanics wouldn't have time to teach, but along with college I learnt a lot from other workers in those days.
Even after giving my mum a couple of quid I could still run a scooter and later a 600cc Matchless with a sidecar I got from a neighbour for £10 so could ride it on L plates (mostly up on two wheels) so that was a laugh. I ran my first car on £9 per week wages and still gave my mum some money.
 
I've googled and it’s got me beat!
Spark plug spanners. Don’t you recognise them?

There is a number on the back of one is B17017 ( for a Model T as Davren says)
My father had a Standard Fordson tractor that ran on petrol / TVO. (Tractor vaporising oil) Start it on petrol then switch to TVO when it was hot enough. Switch over too soon or let it get too cool and the plugs would soon oil up. I remember him using one of those spanners on his tractor plugs.
Back then at least some spark plugs could be taken apart for cleaning and as I remember the jaw removed the plug and the ring end fitted the nut that released the insulator to allow for cleaning.
 
Surely your historic axle stands are your favorite? 😁
LOL.

I have fond memories of that repair. Its the back brakes that traumatised me LOL. Two months of too and fro, i'm surpised it didn't DRIVE me over the edge lol

In case you were wondering (I know you weren't) this is the other masterful book in that stack. It was published in 1968 about our greatest ever bowler. Probably no-one on this forum old enough to remember him!

IMG20240307194417.jpg
 
Trouble is these days the pressure is on, and the other mechanics wouldn't have time to teach, but along with college I learnt a lot from other workers in those days.

I went to a garage last year and the owner put the price I'd paid on a label with the key, so the mechanic doing the job would know how long he should spend on it to make the boss his money. He didn't do the job properly, let alone have time to train someone else. Not all garages are a production line like this though.

Even after giving my mum a couple of quid I could still run a scooter and later a 600cc Matchless with a sidecar I got from a neighbour for £10 so could ride it on L plates (mostly up on two wheels) so that was a laugh. I ran my first car on £9 per week wages and still gave my mum some money.

Sounds like happy days to me!
 
Not something I use now but anyone like to hazard a guess what their purpose would have been in the vehicles tool kit.
I've seen a number of the tool kits that came with the cars, Jaguar in particular I remember had black finished spanners with the Jaguar name embossed in them. Never seen the likes of these two though. Look a bit like gas cylinder keys don't you think? I'm consumed with interest to know what they are.
 
I am guessing the Hexagon drive was for a socket set adaptor as many didn't use 1/2 inch square drive.
Other than that rocker adjusters on an older overhead cam arrangement?
Obviously a bit before your time Mike but I can remember seeing one being used although I was fairly young.
We must have had some old fashioned kit on our farm.
 
I've seen a number of the tool kits that came with the cars, Jaguar in particular I remember had black finished spanners with the Jaguar name embossed in them. Never seen the likes of these two though. Look a bit like gas cylinder keys don't you think? I'm consumed with interest to know what they are.
Spark plug spanners by Ford. To remove and take apart 2 piece plugs.
 
Ok guys (and girls) - here's a few of the tools I bought back in the 60s towards the end of my college days and just starting into work:

P1110650.JPG


The socket set was a special offer at the local factors, made by Kampmann Germany. in AF and Whitworth sizes but, in typical thorough German fashion, the appropriate sockets are also double marked in their equivalent metric sizes! I broke the ratchet and replaced it with the Gordon one you see here. It's got very course teeth but seems unbreakable and the power bar and "T" handle were later Britool purchases. The beam type torque wrench - bottom right - was on offer at the same time so I bought it too. I was very surprised to find it tested out pretty accurate against my digital torque wrench recently. The tool maker's clamp, centre finder and set square were test pieces I made in college around 1959? You'll see the footprint wrench just to the left of them? Well, to it's left is a very cheap pattern made copy which surprisingly actually works better! Have a guess at the rest if you like - some should be easy but some not so maybe?
 
Ok guys (and girls) - here's a few of the tools I bought back in the 60s towards the end of my college days and just starting into work:

View attachment 439678

The socket set was a special offer at the local factors, made by Kampmann Germany. in AF and Whitworth sizes but, in typical thorough German fashion, the appropriate sockets are also double marked in their equivalent metric sizes! I broke the ratchet and replaced it with the Gordon one you see here. It's got very course teeth but seems unbreakable and the power bar and "T" handle were later Britool purchases. The beam type torque wrench - bottom right - was on offer at the same time so I bought it too. I was very surprised to find it tested out pretty accurate against my digital torque wrench recently. The tool maker's clamp, centre finder and set square were test pieces I made in college around 1959? You'll see the footprint wrench just to the left of them? Well, to it's left is a very cheap pattern made copy which surprisingly actually works better! Have a guess at the rest if you like - some should be easy but some not so maybe?
Brittool torque wrench yes, but didn't like the other beam type, Stromberg carb adjusters, crows foot for pinto valve clearances,never used that type of nut splitter, the old type axle plug spanner yes, brake adjusters and bleeders,etc. etc.
Glad to see you look after your tools better than me.:)
 
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