Technical Brake judder after fit new disc?

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Technical Brake judder after fit new disc?

Joined
Oct 1, 2017
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5,907
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Edinburgh Scotland
I have a bearing press tool as described in post 7. It struggled on one side but gear oil on the threads and bolt bearing surfaces got the old bearing off. The new bearings went in fine and the job (while hard work) was really no different to a using a hydraulic press.

I fitted the bearing into the hub carrier, then fitted the (new) hub into the bearing. I got everything from Shop 4 Parts.
Thanks Dave, nice to know these tools work.
 
Joined
Oct 1, 2017
Messages
5,907
Location
Edinburgh Scotland
It’s not always possible. But I do like the satisfying change in note when tapped in a bearing by hammer
Know exactly what you mean. The old style single row type bearings where there was an inner and outer. The outer race would be driven in with a bronze or mild steel (anything softer than the hardened bearing itself) and it would give, give, give with each carefully administered hammer stroke until it went fully home when it would not move and gave off a solid "thunk" as you hit the drift with the hammer. Not much hope of installing a typical front wheel bearing on a modern car in this way though. Not that I'm knocking it though the modern type of "all in one" type bearing has a much better fit between the bearing halves and so much more accurate pre-loads attained. The old style bearings were a heck of a lot easier to do on a DIY basis though.

Edit I think the first of the modern type "all in one" front wheel bearings I came across was in an Austin Maxi and it gave me quite a hard time.
 

vexorg

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Aug 14, 2021
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I'd agree, you'd have no real hope with a hammer on a modern bearing, unless you are built like eddie hall.

I've also seen claims that using a hammer can damage the bearing due to shock, never been convinced of that, but wouldn't take the chance. Threaded rod usually works for getting them in, but I've found on older cars that they are usually not keen on coming out and needs a good hydraulic press to do it right.
 
Joined
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Messages
5,907
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I'd agree, you'd have no real hope with a hammer on a modern bearing, unless you are built like eddie hall.

I've also seen claims that using a hammer can damage the bearing due to shock, never been convinced of that, but wouldn't take the chance. Threaded rod usually works for getting them in, but I've found on older cars that they are usually not keen on coming out and needs a good hydraulic press to do it right.
Driving in bearings with drifts does need a modicum of "common sense" The drift needs to be softer than the bearing and if it doesn't "go" using moderate force than you need to stop and see why - nearly always because you're not driving it in square to the bore of the hub. I really couldn't say how many bearings I've done with a punch on stuff like Marinas, A55 and 60, Hillman Hunter, Imp, Avenger, even Reliant Scimitar and many more. To the best of my knowledge I've never had one subsequently fail. But you've no chance with these modern "wide" bearings. I wouldn't even try. Strip the hub/upright off the vehicle and take it to a friendly local garage or engineering works who will often do it for not very much dosh while you wait using their lovely big hydraulic press.
 
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