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Old 06-08-2017   #16
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Re: My 5ino's transatlantic adventure

So I managed to remove the rear drums, using the trick Peter recommended of the wheel on the ground.

Installed all new pads, springs, piston, handbrake hardware, but when I installed the new drum, the pads are touching the inside of the drum making it hard to spin the wheel. I tried moving things a bit with a rubber mallet, but it still rubs.

Before


After


Also, does someone have a guide to replacing the rear wheel bearings, starting from how to remove the 4 hub bolts?

Thanks
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Old 07-08-2017   #17
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Re: My 5ino's transatlantic adventure

As general advice, NAPA autoparts and some other stores in the U.S. rent specialty tools for ridiculously cheap/and/or for free. Definitely look into them as an option!
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Old 07-08-2017   #18
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Re: My 5ino's transatlantic adventure

When you say you replaced the piston, do you mean the brake cylinder (the thing at the top with rubber at each end that presses against the two brake pads)? It's normal for the new brakes to rub, and near impossible to settle exactly in place by tapping them about. The best method that I know of is to get up to 40mph and slam on the brakes, then rev it up in reverse to a high rpm (15mph?) and lock up the brakes! Repeat 2-3 times and see if the brakes are in a better place.
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Old 07-08-2017   #19
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Re: My 5ino's transatlantic adventure

Quote Originally Posted by turbo500 View Post

Also, does someone have a guide to replacing the rear wheel bearings, starting from how to remove the 4 hub bolts?

Thanks
There are quite few threads on here which deal with the various aspects of that job; you will find them by searching "hub bearings" or similar in the box at the head of the Forum page.

For a starter though, which of the sets of four bolts are you thinking of first? You know how to get the drum off although separating that is not strictly essential at the rear and worth keeping on at this stage. The first thing is to remove the splined, driveshaft coupling inboard of the hub. That is the four 13mm head bolts (setscrews) which screw into the aluminium coupling. These can be quite tight and often have worn heads. Easiest removed with a really good ring-spanner. Keep the car on the ground and roll it along to improve access to all four. When removed, clean flaky bits off the driveshaft and push the cast-iron coupling towards the gearbox a tad. You should be able to wiggle the shaft away, retrieve a small spring (which may be broken) that sits in the end of it, and you will see a very large nut............
To be continued I am sure......
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Old 07-08-2017   #20
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Re: My 5ino's transatlantic adventure

I've just finished a complete overhaul of my brakes and had similar problems to you with rubbing brakes. As Pazzo 500 said, if the rubbing is slight, I wouldn't worry about it. On my car the rear drums were very difficult to turn. To solve the problem I gently levered the shoes back where the adjusters are, using the flange on the back plate as a fulcrum point. Don't over do the levering as you don't want to damage the flange. Some people use a block of wood (to protect the linings) and hammer the shoes back.

I also discovered that my handbrake cable adjustment was wrong for the new shoes and this meant that with the handbrake released the brakes were still on enough to prevent the drums turning.

As Pazzo 500 said, when you've finished working on the brakes, you'll probably find that you've got too much pedal travel. Do what Passo said driving forward and in reverse at 10 to 15mph and repeatedly stamp on the pedal. The pedal travel will reduce as the brakes self adjust. I haven't done any work on rear bearings yet so can't give any advice on the work involved.
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Old 08-08-2017   #21
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Re: My 5ino's transatlantic adventure

Quote Originally Posted by Pazzo500 View Post
As general advice, NAPA autoparts and some other stores in the U.S. rent specialty tools for ridiculously cheap/and/or for free. Definitely look into them as an option!
Hi, I actually ended up going to Autozone and renting a finger type bearing puller for free, but of course it was too big for the job Ended up using wrenches + rubber mallet combo to get behind the bearings and ease them off.

Quote Originally Posted by Pazzo500 View Post
When you say you replaced the piston, do you mean the brake cylinder (the thing at the top with rubber at each end that presses against the two brake pads)? It's normal for the new brakes to rub, and near impossible to settle exactly in place by tapping them about. The best method that I know of is to get up to 40mph and slam on the brakes, then rev it up in reverse to a high rpm (15mph?) and lock up the brakes! Repeat 2-3 times and see if the brakes are in a better place.
I replaced the brake cylinder, but I've also replaced the main brake pump. I will try out the brake adjustment once I've finished all the brake job. I'm dealing with the wrong copper lines (long nipple instead of the correct short nipple).

Also, having replaced all the lines, cylinders and main pump, whats the best way of getting air out of the system without damaging the parts. Do I need to open all the bleed nipples on the cylinders initially when filling the system with brake fluid?

Quote Originally Posted by fiat500 View Post
There are quite few threads on here which deal with the various aspects of that job; you will find them by searching "hub bearings" or similar in the box at the head of the Forum page.

For a starter though, which of the sets of four bolts are you thinking of first? You know how to get the drum off although separating that is not strictly essential at the rear and worth keeping on at this stage. The first thing is to remove the splined, driveshaft coupling inboard of the hub. That is the four 13mm head bolts (setscrews) which screw into the aluminium coupling. These can be quite tight and often have worn heads. Easiest removed with a really good ring-spanner. Keep the car on the ground and roll it along to improve access to all four. When removed, clean flaky bits off the driveshaft and push the cast-iron coupling towards the gearbox a tad. You should be able to wiggle the shaft away, retrieve a small spring (which may be broken) that sits in the end of it, and you will see a very large nut............
To be continued I am sure......
To be continued indeed

I will try to avoid messing with that for a little longer. But thanks for the explanation.

Quote Originally Posted by Hobo1960 View Post
I've just finished a complete overhaul of my brakes and had similar problems to you with rubbing brakes. As Pazzo 500 said, if the rubbing is slight, I wouldn't worry about it. On my car the rear drums were very difficult to turn. To solve the problem I gently levered the shoes back where the adjusters are, using the flange on the back plate as a fulcrum point. Don't over do the levering as you don't want to damage the flange. Some people use a block of wood (to protect the linings) and hammer the shoes back.

I also discovered that my handbrake cable adjustment was wrong for the new shoes and this meant that with the handbrake released the brakes were still on enough to prevent the drums turning.

As Pazzo 500 said, when you've finished working on the brakes, you'll probably find that you've got too much pedal travel. Do what Passo said driving forward and in reverse at 10 to 15mph and repeatedly stamp on the pedal. The pedal travel will reduce as the brakes self adjust. I haven't done any work on rear bearings yet so can't give any advice on the work involved.
I used a rubber mallet to move the pads around, especially the fronts which when initially mounted were too high up and rubbed against the new drums. The rears are not completely stuck, but there is some contact between pads and new drums.

Will do as suggested. I also noticed that on the rear pads, the ones closest to the front of the car tend to jump out of their seat when I manually pulled the hand brake cable, this was with the drum off, so I guess with the drum off there wouldn't be space for them to move as much.


Thanks everyone for all the help
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Old 10-08-2017   #22
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Re: My 5ino's transatlantic adventure

Quick question, what's the smartest way of mounting the grease caps on the front brakes? I tried hammering them in with a mallet and they won't slide in.



Also, just want to see if anyone can give their opinion on what the correct way of filling and bleeding the brake system after replacing brake piston, cylinders, lines etc. System is dry at the moment.
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Old 11-08-2017   #23
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Quote Originally Posted by turbo500 View Post
Quick question, what's the smartest way of mounting the grease caps on the front brakes? I tried hammering them in with a mallet and they won't slide in.
Hmm interesting. When I did mine they just slid back nicely on top. There must be something obstructing it or a poor fit?

With the brakes popping out, I think that's normal because the springs pull on the front portion of the pads. Mine did the same with the hub off, but when back on drove perfectly.

I've tried the stamping method a bit but didn't manage to reduce brake pedal travel but looks like you're doing a full bleed anyway. I imagine it would be as per normal, filling the reservoir and starting with the brake furthest away, always being sure that there's enough fluid on board
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Old 11-08-2017   #24
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Re: My 5ino's transatlantic adventure

Quote Originally Posted by turbo500 View Post
Quick question, what's the smartest way of mounting the grease caps on the front brakes?
There was a special Fiat tool for that. I found that I had a large socket that was a perfect fit on the flange of the grease-cap.
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Old 11-08-2017   #25
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Re: My 5ino's transatlantic adventure

Quote Originally Posted by BambinoClassic View Post
Hmm interesting. When I did mine they just slid back nicely on top. There must be something obstructing it or a poor fit?

With the brakes popping out, I think that's normal because the springs pull on the front portion of the pads. Mine did the same with the hub off, but when back on drove perfectly.

I've tried the stamping method a bit but didn't manage to reduce brake pedal travel but looks like you're doing a full bleed anyway. I imagine it would be as per normal, filling the reservoir and starting with the brake furthest away, always being sure that there's enough fluid on board
Should I open the bleed valves on all the brake cylinders initially? I'm scared of damaging them by pushing only air through them.
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Old 12-08-2017   #26
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Re: My 5ino's transatlantic adventure

Quote Originally Posted by turbo500 View Post
Should I open the bleed valves on all the brake cylinders initially? I'm scared of damaging them by pushing only air through them.
Ah, that I'm not sure of. The only way I do it that differs to the manual is to have someone else at the pedal, and at the bottom of their downstroke, close the valve. Then reopen for them to push down. I think if you open them all at once, you run the risk of air being pulled back in somewhere, but that could just be me overthinking.
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Old 12-08-2017   #27
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Re: My 5ino's transatlantic adventure

Quote Originally Posted by turbo500 View Post
Should I open the bleed valves on all the brake cylinders initially? I'm scared of damaging them by pushing only air through them.
Fill the reservoir up to the line for max. Then pump it through the system with the foot pedal and keep topping up if necessary, with all the bleed nipples closed. Then as bambinoclassic says start at the wheel cylinder furthest from the reservoir. Open the bleed nipple with a little piece of clear tube attached to the nipple into a jam jar or such like with some brake fluid in the bottom of the jar and the clear pipe submerged in it, so you are not drawing air back into the system once the pedal has returned to its normal resting position.

Pump the footpeddle until you stop see air bubbles in the clear pipe but remember to keep topping up the reservoir at the same time. It's really a two person job, you can get one man kits but I have never been a great fan of them on the 500. Once no air bubbles are seen in the clear tube, lock off the nipple with the foot pedal fully depressed and move onto the next furthest wheel cylinder and carry out the same process. Then repeat on the remaining wheel cylinders. You will probably have to carry out the whole process from the start a couple of times, starting at the furthest wheel cylinder just to ensure you have cleared all the air. Hopefully by then you should have a nice solid pedal, you will get some travel on the pedal until the pedal pin depresses the master cylinder.

You won't damage the component putting air only through them. But carried out correctly you should only initially be putting just air through until the fluid works its way through the pipes to the wheel cylinders.

Grab your wife or a friend and sit them in the driving seat to do the pedal work, you just have to shout out clear instructions for them to depress the pedal slowly, not fast as that will make the fluid bubble and when to keep the pedal depressed when you are happy you can see no more bubbles, so you can lock off the nipple each time.

Tony
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Old 12-08-2017   #28
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Re: My 5ino's transatlantic adventure

I should add when initially pumping fluid through the system with someone in the car doing the pedal work. Initially the fluid in the reservoir will go down quite quickly, probably after a couple of depressions of the pedal, so each time you go to check the level of the reservoir and to top it up make sure you lock the nipple off with the pedal fully depressed before you go to check.

Tony
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Old 12-08-2017   #29
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Re: My 5ino's transatlantic adventure

Quote Originally Posted by turbo500 View Post
Quick question, what's the smartest way of mounting the grease caps on the front brakes? I tried hammering them in with a mallet and they won't slide in.
You could do as Peter suggests or use a short length of exhaust pipe or pvc plumbing drain pipe, anything that just fits over the grease cap but pushes against the flange. Check that there's no damage to the lip of the cap. You could file a small chamfer on the lip if it's a tight fit in the hub, just to get it to start in, then tap it home.

Al.
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Old 18-08-2017   #30
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Re: My 5ino's transatlantic adventure

Ok, so I installed brand new brake pump, brake cylinders, copper brake lines, pads, drums.

Filled up the brake fluid reservoir, with all the nipples closed and went to pump the brake pedal....nothing. Completely no resistance.

Tried again, and again and again, brake fluid is not moving from the reservoir. The brake pin from the pedal seems to be correctly placed and I can hear something clicking as it's depressed initially.

I tried opening the nipples to try to move the fluid but still won't go.

Am I missing something??
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