What's made you not grumpy but not smile either today?

StevenRB45

Upstanding Member for Newcastle
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Mar 23, 2007
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Moral - Dont lend your car to ungrateful ****ers.
If you're ever bored...look at the Facebook comments on a car advert that would be given as a class "A" hire car I.e. around 1.0-1.2 litres supermini or owners reviews.

There will always be at least one in the following format.

Terrible little buzz box, had one for a week while my "insert name of much more prestigious car here" was in for repair. Wouldn't wish one on my worst enemy...barely moved, no room for people...avoid.

Now I these always make me laugh a bit...as half the time the car they are comparing it to is at least double the price. But also they are giving away more than they think...their amazing car that is better is off the road, either because it's broken..or they've had an accident they caused. You only get a **** car after an accident if you caused it..otherwise you get an equivalent car which is charged to the other side.

So either the car you're giving the big I am...isn't that good actually or you've crashed it.
 
Joined
Feb 22, 2004
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Faringdon, Oxfordshire UK
Going back to your AA days, what were your thoughts of the 2008-2017 fiesta driving experience? My mate recently had the misfortune of having to borrow his mum's example whilst his Brera was having its clogged DPF sorted, and he hated basically everything about it! I don't know how much of the experience is due to it being a typical crap ford, and how much is due to that particular example being high mileage?
Horrid driving experience.
For anyone who just considers a car as transport, it fits the bill, is undemanding of driver input, and reasonably comfortable. For anyone who likes drivign, or even enjoys driving, the car will very quickly annoy. I used to describe it as "easy to drive, difficult to drive well". Worst bit is the suspension. Feels taut when new, within a fortnight it gets loose. The wheels always go where pointed, grip is very good, directional control good, but the body feels detached from the wheels, choosing to bounce and flop and sway, seemingly quite separately to any external forces. For a learner to abuse, it was good, a little satisfaction there every time it got tortured, but glad to get rid when I gave up the franchise.
When it was new, all the motoring press praised it for its road manners. When I got the first one, new, I thought it must be broken, but the dealer seemed puzzled when I asked if all the suspension was attached properly. I guess the press only got the stiffer sportier models.
With the facelift from 2018, Ford declared that the suspension had been sorted, at last admitting that the earlier one was inadequate. The press then lauded the new one, and declared how the old one was rubbish, contradicting all previous test reports. The new one was only a little better, lasting a month before it started loosening up.
I think what irritated me the most was the 'lies'. The car looks good, inside looks high quality, but underneath the facade it is built as cheaply as possible. Some of us can feel that very quickly, which is why we avoid them. The Panda sits there, being a cheap car, no pretensions, but then overdelivers. (And still does at nearly 16 years old) This gives a great ownership experience. The Fabia, promises to be adequate, and delivers that, without fuss. No disappointments, just very good at what it does, so quite enjoyable, if not grabbing the emotions like a Fiat.
Then there are Peugeots. So many are like driving stodge, with all controls feeling rubbery, and the ride similar. I've just spent 3 days in a new Vauxhall Combo, and 2 days in a Vivaro. Both are just rebadged Peugeot vans. Very soggy, and quite hard work for a full day. If future Fiats become rebadged Peugeots, we're doomed.
 

StevenRB45

Upstanding Member for Newcastle
Joined
Mar 23, 2007
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Newcastle
This a still from my wife's commute this morning...

VideoCapture_20211222-115555.jpg


In the right lane...you will notice some Fetlocks.

It's an undulating road so she'd dipped the beams to not blind the car coming the other way. Then as she drops into a dip..there's champion the wonder horse who's made a bid for freedom.

Only reason I'm not grumpy about it is he was in the other lane, and she flashed down the car coming the other way before anything happened.
 

puntofan01

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 1, 2014
Messages
4,490
Horrid driving experience.
For anyone who just considers a car as transport, it fits the bill, is undemanding of driver input, and reasonably comfortable. For anyone who likes drivign, or even enjoys driving, the car will very quickly annoy. I used to describe it as "easy to drive, difficult to drive well". Worst bit is the suspension. Feels taut when new, within a fortnight it gets loose. The wheels always go where pointed, grip is very good, directional control good, but the body feels detached from the wheels, choosing to bounce and flop and sway, seemingly quite separately to any external forces. For a learner to abuse, it was good, a little satisfaction there every time it got tortured, but glad to get rid when I gave up the franchise.
When it was new, all the motoring press praised it for its road manners. When I got the first one, new, I thought it must be broken, but the dealer seemed puzzled when I asked if all the suspension was attached properly. I guess the press only got the stiffer sportier models.
With the facelift from 2018, Ford declared that the suspension had been sorted, at last admitting that the earlier one was inadequate. The press then lauded the new one, and declared how the old one was rubbish, contradicting all previous test reports. The new one was only a little better, lasting a month before it started loosening up.
I think what irritated me the most was the 'lies'. The car looks good, inside looks high quality, but underneath the facade it is built as cheaply as possible. Some of us can feel that very quickly, which is why we avoid them. The Panda sits there, being a cheap car, no pretensions, but then overdelivers. (And still does at nearly 16 years old) This gives a great ownership experience. The Fabia, promises to be adequate, and delivers that, without fuss. No disappointments, just very good at what it does, so quite enjoyable, if not grabbing the emotions like a Fiat.
Then there are Peugeots. So many are like driving stodge, with all controls feeling rubbery, and the ride similar. I've just spent 3 days in a new Vauxhall Combo, and 2 days in a Vivaro. Both are just rebadged Peugeot vans. Very soggy, and quite hard work for a full day. If future Fiats become rebadged Peugeots, we're doomed.
I have to admit, I really don't get why the motoring press used to wank themselves into a frenzy over that shape fiesta, going by what you and my mate have said about them. I think he said the gear change was pants, but I'd put that down to wear and tear. He also says that the steering has a very aggressive self-centering action which makes it a very knackering car to drive. Do you also have that experience, or is that just dodgy tracking or wear on that particular example?

2 things I did notice (as a passenger,) were awful were the refinement, and the interior. That fiesta is a 1.6 TDCi Titanium, and whilst the seat was surprisingly comfortable, my god, the noise was horrific!! I don't think that's due to the mileage, as his parents were stoopid enough to spend £1500 on a set of new diesel injectors for it not that long ago. As my mate said, there doesn't seem to be any speed/gear combination where the awful engine racket is unobtrusive. 😐 With regards to the interior, I think we looked it up a while back, and brand new, that fiesta would've cost around £15,000; yet the interior is absolutely shocking!! The design is utterly pants, and the plastics were horrendously cheap. I'm not someone who's bothered about the phenomenon of "soft-touch" plastics, but even I found that unacceptable. 😐
 
Joined
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I have to admit, I really don't get why the motoring press used to wank themselves into a frenzy over that shape fiesta, going by what you and my mate have said about them. I think he said the gear change was pants, but I'd put that down to wear and tear. He also says that the steering has a very aggressive self-centering action which makes it a very knackering car to drive. Do you also have that experience, or is that just dodgy tracking or wear on that particular example?

2 things I did notice (as a passenger,) were awful were the refinement, and the interior. That fiesta is a 1.6 TDCi Titanium, and whilst the seat was surprisingly comfortable, my god, the noise was horrific!! I don't think that's due to the mileage, as his parents were stoopid enough to spend £1500 on a set of new diesel injectors for it not that long ago. As my mate said, there doesn't seem to be any speed/gear combination where the awful engine racket is unobtrusive. 😐 With regards to the interior, I think we looked it up a while back, and brand new, that fiesta would've cost around £15,000; yet the interior is absolutely shocking!! The design is utterly pants, and the plastics were horrendously cheap. I'm not someone who's bothered about the phenomenon of "soft-touch" plastics, but even I found that unacceptable. 😐
Having had 11 or 12 of the things, they were not all the same, but all mine were petrol, initially the 1.4 petrol, then the 1.0 petrol turbo, in 125hp and then 100hp. Despite being called 'Eco', fuel economy was identical to the 1.4. I've luckily not had the 'pleasure' of a diesel, so can't comment on them, but the petrols were all quiet enough.
The interior is cheap, looks pretty, but as cheap as possible to achieve this. Durable enough for the year I had each one, and stood the abuse of the learners. No problems with gearchange quality, so probably wear on your mate's. A lot of instructors had issue with the top of the gearknob coming off, but I never experienced that.

The original steering was always light, but ok. Later Ford changed the gearing, making it only 1¼ turns to full lock, instead of the original 1½ turns. This made it too edgy, making it too easy to oversteer on any turn, and difficult to keep in a straight line. Hard work for an experienced driver, incredibly difficult for a learner, we just zig-zagged our way along. After complaints from other instructors, Ford reverted to the original gearing, but returned to the tighter one with the facelift. Glad to see the back of the horrid things.
 

puntofan01

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Joined
Mar 1, 2014
Messages
4,490
Having had 11 or 12 of the things, they were not all the same, but all mine were petrol, initially the 1.4 petrol, then the 1.0 petrol turbo, in 125hp and then 100hp. Despite being called 'Eco', fuel economy was identical to the 1.4. I've luckily not had the 'pleasure' of a diesel, so can't comment on them, but the petrols were all quiet enough.
The interior is cheap, looks pretty, but as cheap as possible to achieve this. Durable enough for the year I had each one, and stood the abuse of the learners. No problems with gearchange quality, so probably wear on your mate's. A lot of instructors had issue with the top of the gearknob coming off, but I never experienced that.

The original steering was always light, but ok. Later Ford changed the gearing, making it only 1¼ turns to full lock, instead of the original 1½ turns. This made it too edgy, making it too easy to oversteer on any turn, and difficult to keep in a straight line. Hard work for an experienced driver, incredibly difficult for a learner, we just zig-zagged our way along. After complaints from other instructors, Ford reverted to the original gearing, but returned to the tighter one with the facelift. Glad to see the back of the horrid things.
I suspect that, lack of refinement aside, all the issues he reported were just down to wear and tear. Still not a nice means of getting around, but not a representative example of the breed. I certainly won't be wasting my hard earned money on 1 of the little eyesores!!
 
Joined
Feb 22, 2004
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Faringdon, Oxfordshire UK
There's a young guy down the road who parks his MINI opposite my house, but nearly always facing into the cul-de-sac, having never learned that turning it around on arrival makes a quicker exit next time. He seems to be working nights recently, so we get the noisy thing arriving around 8am, instead of leaving around then. This morning, he arrived with the usual gruff exhaust noise, then proceeded to shuffle the car as parking is apparently not easy for him. As I looked out, I witnessed a strange action. Cars parked overnight attract moisture, and whilst some will wipe this off the windows with a squeegee, most choose to wind the windows down and up again. This is normally done before setting off, but this guy just did this after arriving home. Then turned the car off, and walked down the road.
Any psychiatrists willing to explain that one?
 
Joined
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Messages
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Faringdon, Oxfordshire UK
Headed off out early to do the last minute shopping. Traffic light, so mostly a good drive, at higher than normal speeds. Actually at the speed limit for most of it, a nice change.
Joining the main road, I was following a small Volvo gently up the hill. I tend not to push the Panda too much up this hill with a cold engine, but had to ease off following this guy. Despite the filthy roads recently, his car was very clean and shiny, looking new, although over 7 years old. A clue there for me, that the driving may well fall short of average. Eventually we achieved 45mph in the 60, but entering the 50 limit, up he went to 50. Fathom that.
200 yards from a roundabout, on came his left indicator. Not for the lay-by though, as he trundled past that. Then at the roundabout, the signal cancelled, as he swept from the left lane, cut the roundabout using all the space, and exited at 12 O'clock. Genius.
At least he was gone.
 
Joined
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Alerted by a loud voice outside, looking out, I see a woman on an invalid scooter, shouting on the phone. Around her neck are bluetooth headphones, presumably connecting to her phone for music. So why do they not do the phone call too?
Then she moved on whilst still on the phone call, and dropped a wheel off the edge of the footpath. Luckily that side appears to be with a good leg, as she was able to catch the wobble/fall and stay upright. Evidence perhaps why using a phone while driving is a bad idea.
 

StevenRB45

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Having had 11 or 12 of the things, they were not all the same, but all mine were petrol, initially the 1.4 petrol, then the 1.0 petrol turbo, in 125hp and then 100hp. Despite being called 'Eco', fuel economy was identical to the 1.4. I've luckily not had the 'pleasure' of a diesel, so can't comment on them, but the petrols were all quiet enough.

1.6 diesel would be the 90bhp "econetic"...I.e. the 1.6 hdi that has sat in many many cars like a dog poo on a rug.

While I won't go as far to say it entirely ruined our DS3...it was only 90% of everything that was wrong with it.

Something like 12-14 seconds to 60 mph but only if you drove like a loon with no eardrums.

Driven it in multiple vehicles and a few vans...was horrid in all of them.
 
Joined
Feb 22, 2004
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Popped out in the Panda yesterday, started it up, and the ABS and brake warning lamps remained lit. Otherwise it drove fine. Not going far, so resolved to check any stored codes sometime.
Only went a mile or so, parked it, returned an hour later, started it up, all lights off, no issues.

It did this once before, several years ago. I think it is just upset if I start it too quickly while it is performing its checks.
 
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East
Horrid driving experience.
For anyone who just considers a car as transport, it fits the bill, is undemanding of driver input, and reasonably comfortable. For anyone who likes drivign, or even enjoys driving, the car will very quickly annoy. I used to describe it as "easy to drive, difficult to drive well". Worst bit is the suspension. Feels taut when new, within a fortnight it gets loose. The wheels always go where pointed, grip is very good, directional control good, but the body feels detached from the wheels, choosing to bounce and flop and sway, seemingly quite separately to any external forces. For a learner to abuse, it was good, a little satisfaction there every time it got tortured, but glad to get rid when I gave up the franchise.
When it was new, all the motoring press praised it for its road manners. When I got the first one, new, I thought it must be broken, but the dealer seemed puzzled when I asked if all the suspension was attached properly. I guess the press only got the stiffer sportier models.
With the facelift from 2018, Ford declared that the suspension had been sorted, at last admitting that the earlier one was inadequate. The press then lauded the new one, and declared how the old one was rubbish, contradicting all previous test reports. The new one was only a little better, lasting a month before it started loosening up.
I think what irritated me the most was the 'lies'. The car looks good, inside looks high quality, but underneath the facade it is built as cheaply as possible. Some of us can feel that very quickly, which is why we avoid them. The Panda sits there, being a cheap car, no pretensions, but then overdelivers. (And still does at nearly 16 years old) This gives a great ownership experience. The Fabia, promises to be adequate, and delivers that, without fuss. No disappointments, just very good at what it does, so quite enjoyable, if not grabbing the emotions like a Fiat.
Then there are Peugeots. So many are like driving stodge, with all controls feeling rubbery, and the ride similar. I've just spent 3 days in a new Vauxhall Combo, and 2 days in a Vivaro. Both are just rebadged Peugeot vans. Very soggy, and quite hard work for a full day. If future Fiats become rebadged Peugeots, we're doomed.
We are doomed then! But, we might get the engine we paid for though so there is a silver pig in every stellantis..... Your comments on the Fiesta are bang on the money. I had one for a short while on hire and thought it was a decent thing. I have never warmed to Fords they are perfectly decent and very good indeed in many ways but totally lacking in soul, just decent enough from A to B.
 

AndyRKett

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We are doomed then! But, we might get the engine we paid for though so there is a silver pig in every stellantis..... Your comments on the Fiesta are bang on the money. I had one for a short while on hire and thought it was a decent thing. I have never warmed to Fords they are perfectly decent and very good indeed in many ways but totally lacking in soul, just decent enough from A to B.
For many years, year after year the fiesta was the best selling car in the uk, that bubble seems to have burst spectacularly last year and it’s not just dropped off the top spot but it’s gone a long way down the rankings, maybe because of the lack of electric/hybrid models? Maybe because people don’t rent cars during lock downs so rental companies stopped buying them? What ever the reasons what did happen was the Stellantis designed corsa took the top spot which could be a good sign for fiat??

There where the polo, golf, Nissan suv, mini Mercedes’ and I think the fiesta was number 8 after all that. It might not be helped that the fiesta is a pretty old design now as well.
 
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Not grumpy, not smiling but rather sad at this. After a very cold night last night, cars all covered in frost this morning, it turned out to be a glorious sunny day. Very "atmospheric" at this time of the year with the sun very low in the sky even at mid day and long long shadows from fence posts etc. Decided to walk up to the library to return some books I've read and there was a couple of feet or so of misty air hanging over the old bowling greens - very "pretty". I passed a rather nice looking '07 plate silver Grande Punto on the way, parked up at the kerbside, noticing as I went past, that the front O/S tyre looked like it had only about 5 psi in it. On the return journey there was a young chap getting into it as I approached. Can't believe he didn't see the tyre and I was too far away to easily draw his attention to it. He started up the engine and started to drive off. As soon as he started to move you could hear the gearbox was in dire straights - input bearing for starters - He passed me just as he went for 2nd gear and turned the radio on loudly!
 

StevenRB45

Upstanding Member for Newcastle
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For many years, year after year the fiesta was the best selling car in the uk, that bubble seems to have burst spectacularly last year and it’s not just dropped off the top spot but it’s gone a long way down the rankings, maybe because of the lack of electric/hybrid models? Maybe because people don’t rent cars during lock downs so rental companies stopped buying them? What ever the reasons what did happen was the Stellantis designed corsa took the top spot which could be a good sign for fiat??

There where the polo, golf, Nissan suv, mini Mercedes’ and I think the fiesta was number 8 after all that. It might not be helped that the fiesta is a pretty old design now as well.
I noted the "Puma" essyouvee..I.e. the less efficient, more expensive, worse handling Fiesta...made number 8.

Fashion n that...also Ford produced the Fiesta with a sub 300 litre boot and sub-standard interior space...so there's that as well.
 
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Popped out in the Panda yesterday, started it up, and the ABS and brake warning lamps remained lit. Otherwise it drove fine. Not going far, so resolved to check any stored codes sometime.
Only went a mile or so, parked it, returned an hour later, started it up, all lights off, no issues.

It did this once before, several years ago. I think it is just upset if I start it too quickly while it is performing its checks.
Only just noticed this post PB. We've had a couple of incidents, over the 4 years we've now owned Becky (2010 Panda for those who don't "know" me) where similar lights have appeared and then gone away later - the power steering wheel symbol was one that "frightened" me! After reading a post on our forum about waiting until the little padlock symbol extinguishes before operating the starter motor - that must have been a good 2 years ago - We've had no more "rogue" dashboard lights showing. I notice that by doing this the fuel pump can be heard to prime the system and then go quiet again before you are operating the starter. She always fires up with a minimum of cranking required and maybe that's because the fuel system is well primed?
 

DaveMcT

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Sep 14, 2009
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17,856
Just discovered that the low brake fluid warning works on mine. WTF!!! Oh, it's "only" a leaking rear brake caliper. The hand brake seals have done a whoopsie. I need a new caliper new pads (recently replaced) and probably a pair of discs to make the full set. Other side was replaced last year. More the fool me for not doing them both at the same time.
 
Joined
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A car arrives quickly, and stops abruptly outside. The dog next door starts to bark. Continues to bark, unreprimanded. No-one next door reacts. Driver of car gets out, slams one door, opens another, walks to the door (next door), has to bang on the door hard. A few moments later, door opens, takeaway received, front door slams. Dog still barking. Car door slams, drives away with more fuss than necessary. dog still barking. Then the shout. Despite all this commotion, the 13yr old has to be called down for his dinner. At last, dog gets tired of barking, so stops.

They're expecting a food delivery. Most people would be looking and listening, but despite the arrival noises, and the dog, they still have to be summoned by the door knocking. Boy upstairs, still has to be called.

Four people and a dog. Fewer than 5 brain cells between them.
 

StevenRB45

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Yeet!


Done this in a 30 zone, around a corner that you can hang onto at about 40 in a mk1 punto. It's second corner of an S bend...so what he's done here is go far to fast into corner 1...lift then turn into corner 2...and the Mini has gone "I see cowabunga it is!" and gone off at 180 degrees to the direction of travel.



View attachment 400573
To quote myself...I definitely know how he's done it.

Went out in the C3 tonight, left the corner at the other end of the village there's plenty of clay mud carried on to the road from the new houses and off the fields. Despite me travelling at 10-15 below the standing limit (60 on this one) and being on siped all seasons I managed to get "Warning" feeling when the trajectory doesn't quite match what your inner ear is expecting. Normally you could carry 60 round it with little difficulty.

No dramas as such I was probably only an inch or so off my expected line and the esp didn't even consider it but need to be careful clearly. The roads are actually slippy underfoot when you cross them..
 
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