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Old 30-11-2016   #16
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Re: 1964 Fiat 600 D issues

Try a borrowed coil.
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Old 03-12-2016   #17
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Re: 1964 Fiat 600 D issues

The spark looks okay, even after the engine has died. So I guess it`s a fuel/air problem.
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Old 23-04-2017   #18
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Re: 1964 Fiat 600 D issues

I have been having the exact same issue as well.
I drive the car for 20 minutes and then it starts stalling. I let it sit for 10 minutes and then I can drive home and it starts stalling again.
I have changed every electrical part on the car a feel Ignition coil, condensor, wires, plugs and still having the issue.
My next attemp to correct the issue is to put a new fuel pump on and see if this helps. I have a mechanical one and an electrical one, any suggestions?
I am also going to take out the fuel tank and clean and coat the inside of it. I was also told that there is a filter inside the tank that I should take out. I do not see this filter on any of the documentation that I have.

Any help or suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

P.S. I also installed an electrical fan, front radiator and electrical water pump which keeps the car at perfect temperature but still get the stalling!
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Old 24-04-2017   #19
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Re: 1964 Fiat 600 D issues

Quote Originally Posted by El Wopo66 View Post
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.................... I was also told that there is a filter inside the tank that I should take out. I do not see this filter on any of the documentation that I have.
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The filter is probably the small mesh 'bag' fitted (crimped) to the end of the fuel pick-up pipe which is part of the fuel tank sender unit assembly. It can usually be cleaned, you'll probably find it choked with rusty dust from the tank/old fuel.

Have you checked if the fuel tank cap can breathe. Very common on motorcycles, if air can't get into the fuel tank, a vacuum can build up preventing fuel from getting out. On the older Fiats, iirc, the breather on the fuel tank cap is in the centre around the centre red? button. Try prising the rubber sealing washer out of the underside of the cap and see if you can see a way for air to enter the tank as fuel is drawn out.

Also, iirc Fiats had a mesh filter inside the fuel pump (possibly under a domed cover secured by a 10mm nut (6mm thread size)) which could be cleaned.

One old test for fuel pumps was to start the engine to prime the carb. etc.
Switch off, disconnect the fuel hose at the carb. and place the open end in a measuring jug or bottle. Start engine and run it at a fast idle, pump should deliver approx. 1 pint in approx. 1 minute, as a rough guide. Obviously the engine won't run for very long on the contents of the carb. float chamber which is why I said approx. 1 minute.

I prefer to stick with a mechanical pump if originally fitted. The output of a mechanical pump varies with engine speed, whereas electrical pumps output is fairly constant (unless battery voltage drops!). This sometimes overwhelms an old float valve needle and seat which heretofore was fine with the mechanical pump. Sometimes a separate fuel pressure regulator is also required. Others might argue that an electrical pump can be fitted close to the tank at the front of the vehicle and push the fuel to the carb rather than sucking the fuel as the mechanical pump does. This has benefits in helping to prevent fuel boiling/vaporisation/percolation (fuel under pressure doesn't boil as easily as fuel under suction), plus the electrical pump can be fitted away from the heat of the engine bay and fuel lines can be re-routed away from the hot parts of the engine such as the exhaust. If converting to an electrical pump, it's a good idea to fit an inertia type cut-out switch for safety reasons.

Hth,

Al.
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Old 25-04-2017   #20
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Re: 1964 Fiat 600 D issues

I prefer to stick with a mechanical pump if originally fitted. The output of a mechanical pump varies with engine speed, whereas electrical pumps output is fairly constant (unless battery voltage drops!). This sometimes overwhelms an old float valve needle and seat which heretofore was fine with the mechanical pump. Sometimes a separate fuel pressure regulator is also required. Others might argue that an electrical pump can be fitted close to the tank at the front of the vehicle and push the fuel to the carb rather than sucking the fuel as the mechanical pump does. This has benefits in helping to prevent fuel boiling/vaporisation/percolation (fuel under pressure doesn't boil as easily as fuel under suction), plus the electrical pump can be fitted away from the heat of the engine bay and fuel lines can be re-routed away from the hot parts of the engine such as the exhaust. If converting to an electrical pump, it's a good idea to fit an inertia type cut-out switch for safety reasons.


I have an electrical and mechanical fuel pump and I was leaning towards installing the electrical one with the safety relay but at this point I am going to install the new mechanical pump. I have cleaned the filter in the past and have done so every season before taking it for a drive in the spring after the long Canadian winter. I have always wanted to coat the inside of the tank after cleaning it but have never taken the time, I believe it's time now. I will let you know how this works out.
Thanks for the help!
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Old 25-04-2017   #21
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Re: 1964 Fiat 600 D issues

The problem with my car was air leakage between carburettor and manifold/support due to rough surfaces. I straighten up the surfaces and replaced gaskets, now my car can run for hours
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Old 15-10-2018   #22
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Re: 1964 Fiat 600 D issues

It was the coil.
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